Jefferson, Marx and Intelligent Design

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 8, 2006 | Go to article overview

Jefferson, Marx and Intelligent Design


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

In 1776 Thomas Jefferson declared: "We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights." Has American culture of the past 230 years been based on a religious myth? During this period, America has demonstrated an unprecedented (although far from perfect) example of altruism, sacrificing its blood and treasure on a global level to defend liberty and oppose tyranny.

What if Jefferson had declared: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men resulted from evolution, based on survival of the fittest"? What kind of a government might have emerged based on that worldview?

Perhaps it would have more closely resembled the governments Karl Marx inspired. Marx's atheistic vision of class struggle and the survival of the superior class is fundamentally an evolutionist's view of man. The resulting totalitarian governments viewed people as material beings, lacking any inalienable rights. Communist dictators murdered tens of millions of innocents in the name of "progress."

So does it really make any difference whether we believe in evolution or divine creation as our ultimate cause? Yes. The Cold War's essence was an ideological struggle between a creationist and an atheistic-evolutionist worldview.

Now that ideological war is being fought in the U.S. courts. I have great respect for the ACLU, which has been fighting to preserve our liberties. However, I find it ironic that the ACLU is fighting to quash the academic debate in support of the very assumption from which its precious liberties are derived. In its opposition to a discussion of "intelligent design" in schools, the ACLU is undermining its own foundation.

Unfortunately, the debate between intelligent design and evolution has been hijacked by radicals on both sides. Some fundamental Christians deny the clear evidence of science, which conclusively demonstrates that the earth has been developing for billions of years, and that life has existed for hundreds of millions of years. Clearly, evolution is an accurate description of the way living organisms develop and adapt over time.

Some fundamental atheists portray intelligent design as a thinly veiled effort to displace good science with religious dogma, or they trivialize it as pseudo-science. …

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