APHSA Thanks These Volunteers

Policy & Practice, December 2005 | Go to article overview

APHSA Thanks These Volunteers


Volunteers from State Agencies that Assisted Hurricane Katrina Victims

Ten states sent a total of 163 human service workers to Louisiana and Alabama to help with hurricane relief work, mostly with the Disaster Food Stamp Program. The American Public Human Services Association expresses its deep appreciation to these workers for their dedication and compassion.

Delaware (5)

Shauntrelle Holmes, Michele Twilley, Patricia Daniels, Dawn Fletcher, Patricia Kasinath.

Iowa (15)

Carolyn Blasingame, Laurie Gibson, Martha Green, Sandy Kokotan, Jeanette Kugler, Mary McElroy, Gayle Messerole, Sheila Morenz, Julie Rodgers, Carol Rogers, Cindy Scharf, Gary Schmid, Kevin Strunk, Melissa Werner, Elizabeth Wyss.

Kansas (35)

Mark Wunder, Allen Mossman, Colleen Prohaska, Bill Dow, Cindy McKenzie, Cindy Norton, Kim Davis, Pat Ochs, Karen Zeleznak, Terry Rudkin, Janice Knox, Terri Tunison, Malynda Godinez, Tim Wright, William Rosewicz, Jonina Anthony, Debbie Dunlap, Debra Hobbs, Vinnie Harmon, Delphia Gomez, Joe Eisenbarth, Deb Raymer, Tonie Dugan, Alice Womack, Penny Schau, Liz Grace, Larry McGillvary, Jim Waddell, Vickie Harvey, Angela Peterson, Sue Patterson, Glenna Kleinkauf, Martin Mendoza, Carla Stowell, Mike Winkle.

Kentucky (10)

Lana Qualls, Dana Dacy, Jane Hammack, Denise Amburgey, Cynthia Mickelson, Betty Nunn, Lori Huff, Debbie Fitzgerrel, Joyce Pumphrey, Sandra Heck.

Maryland (3)

Steve Kearns, Jerome Patterson, Gloria Webster.

Michigan (25)

Tina Williams, Judy Hasse, Brian Granger, Deb Ruiz, Michelle Judge, Karla Smith, Judith Bell, Mary Hamilton, Robert Collins, Ann Clark-Plas, Thomas Christopherson, Ann Colbert, Deborah Bastien, Susan Saxton, Geraldine Monroe, Lachay Wilson, Beverly Ann Starr, Anita Asbury, Donnas Cuevas, Deborah Wilson, Donna Rollins, Octavia Inman, Diane Horne, Barbara Frison, Amy Claudine Flowers. …

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APHSA Thanks These Volunteers
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