Repetitive Reiteration

By Solomon, Frank | Policy & Practice, December 2005 | Go to article overview

Repetitive Reiteration


Solomon, Frank, Policy & Practice


Most writers stutter in rough drafts because they start off by writing as they talk, using redundancies in abundance like radio and television advertising copy. Our vocabulary is full of "personal" friend, "future" planning, "completely" destroyed, "old" adage and the like. Oral English, our mother tongue, its spoken words wafting by irretrievably, needs much repetition because the words don't stay and the listener might not hear them or forget them as soon as they are said. Say it twice and your listener has a better chance of catching it. Thus you hear the catch phrases and words repeated (again and again) on TV and radio ads. Think car ads.

Writing the same phrases and words twice? You will usually look foolish.

To look for redundancies, examine verbs and think direction: up and down, in and out. Verbs, being action words, often tell their own general direction. Any that you add are often too much. Below are some examples:

The dancer spun around.

The leaves twirled around in rustling spirals.

These also contain around: rotate, revolve, gyrate, pirouette, circle, swirl, skirt.

Check ups and aboves.

The balloon soared into the clouds above.

He scaled the snow-covered peak above him.

They will ascend up in the Navy's new rocket.

He scaled up the building like a human fly.

He headed up the committee.

The platoon advanced up (or forward) half a mile.

Mounted up on the white horse, she ...

Also, zoom, levitate, fill, eat.

Check downs and belows.

The astronauts are descending down over land.

The plane plummeted to the ground below.

The baby fell to the balcony below.

The tanker sank down to the bottom without a trace.

She was well-known for diving down to great depths.

He dismounted down from the injured horse.

The hemlines dip down on both sides.

None of these need down: dig, sink, droop, sag, swoop, plummet, drink, gulp.

Check back.

The district attorney referred back to his notes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Repetitive Reiteration
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.