Rory's Week; Perhaps the PM Should Adopt Ariel Sharon's Latest Wheeze: Ditch His Recalcitrant Party and Create Another One. David Cameron Could Make a Good Partner

By Bremner, Rory | New Statesman (1996), November 28, 2005 | Go to article overview

Rory's Week; Perhaps the PM Should Adopt Ariel Sharon's Latest Wheeze: Ditch His Recalcitrant Party and Create Another One. David Cameron Could Make a Good Partner


Bremner, Rory, New Statesman (1996)


With less than two weeks to go, it seems that only about half the membership of the Tory party has cast its vote for a new leader. One can only assume they don't understand the question.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

They'd better hurry up. With the onset of winter, the spectre of bird flu and the shortage of suitable vaccines, the party's core support--the elderly--could soon be decimated. Perhaps the quality they most need in a leader is the ability to kill a chicken with his bare hands. That would be David Davis, then.

During my current tour show, I have a section where members of the audience submit questions, the idea being to get into some of the subjects we cover in Bremner, Bird and Fortune which don't lend themselves easily to stand-up. Asked how I voted in 1997, I began with my stock response that to vote against Tony Blair that year would have been to vote against hope. But then the parallels struck me. Back then, the Conservative government had grown tired and fractious, with a significant minority determined to bring the leadership to heel. Ministerial resignations and minor scandals had given an impression of sleaze and complacency, and people felt powerless in the face of creeping privatisation and market forces. Things could only get better, we were told. As it is, we should perhaps console ourselves that whereas it took the Tories 18 years to get to the state they reached in 1997, Labour has managed it in eight.

I wonder what Blair makes of the Israeli premier Ariel Sharon's latest wheeze: to give up on his recalcitrant party and create a new one. ("What a great idea! Why didn't I think of that?") In seeking new partners, he could even give David Cameron a call, since the Tory hopeful has shown a willingness to support Blair's reforms, rather than oppose them for the sake of opposition. (Where's the point in that? They're Conservative reforms anyway, and supporting Blair against his party is by far the most effective tactic the opposition has at its disposal. When it comes to annoying Blair's backbenchers, nothing else comes close.)

In any case, such is the identity of interest between Cameron and Blair that they could happily coexist as party leaders, both competing for the centre-right ground. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rory's Week; Perhaps the PM Should Adopt Ariel Sharon's Latest Wheeze: Ditch His Recalcitrant Party and Create Another One. David Cameron Could Make a Good Partner
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.