Colorful Preview of Provencal Paul Cezanne

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 27, 2006 | Go to article overview

Colorful Preview of Provencal Paul Cezanne


Byline: Ann Geracimos, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

It's a stretch, perhaps, to link car bodies to paint on paper and canvas, but that didn't stop a representative of DaimlerChrysler Corp. from connecting the two - saying they share "beauty, power, passion" - during Wednesday's preview celebrations of "Cezanne in Provence" at the National Gallery of Art.

Everything in context: The company is sponsor of the capital's latest museum blockbuster - a show of 117 works by the French master opens Sunday and runs through May 7, after which it goes to the artist's hometown, Aix-en-Provence, where he lived most of his life.

Until then and even beyond, Washington suffices well as a haven for the great man's legacy because a large repository of his works was available here long before the exhibit was planned to commemorate the centenary of his death in 1906.

The Phillips Collection and the White House (which owns eight works, four on display in the private quarters) are among the lenders, and there's also the gallery's own impressive trove of Paul Cezanne's works from the collections of Chester Dale, Paul Mellon, W. Averell Harriman and Eugene and Agnes Meyer.

Washington is using the occasion to go gaga over Provencal life in full with a series of events planned at various venues during what is being termed Provence Week, beginning Monday. Restaurants taking part include the private dining room and cafeteria in the Dirksen Senate Office Building.

Atmospherics Wednesday evening included a trio playing music by Claude Debussy, plus an array of Provencal-themed hors d'oeuvres and wine. Then some 300 guests trooped into the East Sculpture Hall for dinner (bouillabaisse, mignonettes de veau, salad, cheese, oeufs a la neige) and introductory remarks by gallery President Vicki Sant identifying Cezanne as "one of the greatest and most influential artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries."

Observing the colorful surroundings (plenty of roses, lavender and other decorative flora) and the number of French citizens present (mostly officials from Provence), he led with a cozy line about having "to stop and ask myself, 'Am I in France or the U.S.?' " before grandiloquently hailing "links forging the two countries" and asking rhetorically,. "What could be more precious than offering the very presence of Paul Cezanne? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Colorful Preview of Provencal Paul Cezanne
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.