Cornell NutritionWorks Web Site Nourishes Community Practitioners

By Ulrich, Clare | Human Ecology, December 2005 | Go to article overview

Cornell NutritionWorks Web Site Nourishes Community Practitioners


Ulrich, Clare, Human Ecology


One hundred years ago, Martha Van Rensselaer drove throughout upstate New York to bring information about nutrition and hygiene to rural farm wives. Today, Christina Stark, extension associate in the Division of Nutritional Sciences, uses a 21st century means of delivering extension education; she is using the Internet to connect nutrition professionals throughout the nation and the world with current research in their field, which ultimately benefits the people they serve. Stark is the program leader for Cornell NutritionWorks, an interactive web site that offers professional development to nutrition and health practitioners, including Cornell Cooperative Extension nutritionists serving residents throughout New York State. The web site (www.nutritionworks.cornell.edu) uses distance technology to provide a variety of continuing education opportunities for the target audience. Cornell NutritionWorks members can interact with Cornell faculty through an Ask the Nutrition Expert feature, access cutting-edge nutrition information, download resources and tools that enhance practice, participate in discussion forums with peers, and take online self-assessments for continuing professional education units. In addition, the web site offers the latest nutrition research from the Division of Nutritional Sciences, recommends links, and has a complete reference center.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"NutritionWorks was developed to meet the needs of community practitioners who feel professionally isolated, who want to keep up to date with the latest research-based nutrition information, who want to interact with researchers and peers, and who don't have the time or funds to travel for continuing education," Stark explains.

Membership in Cornell NutritionWorks became free in 2004, and new members can register easily online. To date, there are more than 2,400 members, who come from all 50 states and 46 countries.

At the moment, over 20 topics designed to provide continuing education credit are available. The presenters are predominately faculty members within the Division of Nutritional Sciences; Stark has also featured experts from institutions outside of Cornell. For example, some of the newest offerings will include audio-visual cyber-presentations of invited speakers who participated in Cornell's Ecology of Obesity conference in June 2005. These include James Hill from the University of Colorado on obesity and energy balance, James Sallis from San Diego State University on obesity and the built environment, and Penny Gordon-Larsen from the University of North Carolina on socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in obesity. Plans are underway to make additional resources and materials resulting from the Ecology of Obesity conference available on Cornell NutritionWorks.

If a member chooses to take an offering for continuing professional education credit, the charge is $15 per credit, which can be paid online. A certificate of completion is instantly available, and each member's progress is tracked with a personalized transcript. Cornell NutritionWorks is a Commission on Dietetic Registration Accredited Provider. The offerings for credit cover a spectrum of subjects--such as childhood obesity, low-carbohydrate diets, regulation of genetically engineered foods, trans fatty acids, and infant formulas. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cornell NutritionWorks Web Site Nourishes Community Practitioners
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.