Transdisciplinary Research Is Needed for Positive Health Outcomes

By Winter, Metta | Human Ecology, December 2005 | Go to article overview

Transdisciplinary Research Is Needed for Positive Health Outcomes


Winter, Metta, Human Ecology


In the session on "Opportunities for Transdisciplinary Research and Action" during the Ecology of Obesity conference held at Cornell June 6 and 7, 2005, Amanda Birnbaum, an assistant professor in the Department of Public Health at Weill Cornell Medical College, cited improvements in maternal mortality in the developed world as an example of how positive health outcomes can be gained through environmental change. The incidence of life-threatening complications from pregnancy is the same throughout the world, she said, yet the reason that women in developed countries don't die in the large numbers that women in the developing world do is that they have access to emergency obstetrical care.

"It makes no sense to tell a woman who is having an obstetrical emergency to go and get care if none is available," Birnbaum said. "In the same vein, before telling people that they should work hard to make changes in their diet and physical activities, we should first change the environment to ensure their success."

Carol Devine, an associate professor in Cornell's Division of Nutritional Sciences, spoke of the shift in role that researchers must accept if they are to conduct meaningful community-based research aimed at obesity prevention.

"To create community engagement, researchers can no longer function as the experts in all things," said Devine, who is conducting two community-based research projects in New York State, one in rural Delaware County and the other in a worksite in the city of Rochester. "It's a waste of your time if community members don't take the project on as their own."

What outside researchers can provide are study design; assessment tools; and assistance in data collection, interpretation, and design of locally chosen interventions, according to Devine. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Transdisciplinary Research Is Needed for Positive Health Outcomes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.