WHOI Opens New Research Facilities

By Carlowicz, Mike; Madin, Kate | Oceanus, December 2005 | Go to article overview

WHOI Opens New Research Facilities


Carlowicz, Mike, Madin, Kate, Oceanus


For the first time in 15 years, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has added significant office and laboratory space to its Quissett Campus. This fall, scientists, technical staff, and students started moving into more than 67,000 square feet of new space, a 25 percent increase in the Institution's scientific facilities.

The additions are the 31,950-square-foot Marine Research Facility and the 35,570-square-foot Stanley W. Watson Laboratory. Other improvements have also been made around campus.

More than 90 members of the Institution staff are moving from labs in the village of Woods Hole and other parts of the WHOI Quissett Campus, and all researchers should be in their new labs by the end of 2005. The new buildings will be officially dedicated in spring 2006.

"It's like a different institution," said ecologist Jestis Pineda, who now has twice as much lab and office space as he did in the basement of the Redfield Building. "There are many places to meet people and have discussions, so we talk more about our projects."

For nearly a decade, WHOI has been attracting specialists in marine mammal and ecological research, but those scientists have been spread out in four different buildings. The new Marine Research Facility houses almost all of these researchers in one setting that is better-suited to their needs--with more room, large freezers, medical-style imaging equipment, and facilities for dissection and necropsies.

"Scientists designed their own spaces from the ground up," said biologist Scott Gallager. "It will let us do things like developing large instruments and optical systems that we couldn't do before."

The Institution's master planning committee also saw a need to pull scientists together in the burgeoning field of biogeochemistry, which investigates the chemical interactions of living things with rocks, sediments, seawater, the seafloor, and hydrothermal vents.

"We are on the verge of understanding how the chemistry and physics of the ocean and the atmosphere influence, and are influenced by, biological processes," said Jim Luyten, WHOI Executive Vice President and Director of Research. "Microbiologists, geochemists, and geologists were spread out in different buildings and on different campuses. We needed to do something to enhance opportunities for interdisciplinary interaction and stimulate work on this leading edge of ocean science. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

WHOI Opens New Research Facilities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.