Wireless Communication: Wireless Technologies, Particularly School Networks, Are a Small but Growing Trend in American Schools. and It's Keeping Students and Staff Safer

By Pascopella, Angela | District Administration, February 2006 | Go to article overview

Wireless Communication: Wireless Technologies, Particularly School Networks, Are a Small but Growing Trend in American Schools. and It's Keeping Students and Staff Safer


Pascopella, Angela, District Administration


Drug dealing in American high schools can look as innocent as buying an ice cream cone. And that is exactly what happened in El Paso, Texas, last year.

An ice cream vendor decided to dish out another flavor last year in the student parking lot at Riverside High School in the Ysleta Independent School District, which borders Mexico, and this time it was Ganja ala Mode.

The legitimate ice cream vendor was handing out ice cream cones filled with marijuana to up to a dozen students every other day and administrators finally caught wind of it from an informant.

What made the quick bust possible was a wireless personal digital assistant.

A young, female officer posed as a student buying the super duper cone and with her Palm Pilot handheld at the same time, took photos of the dealer, photos of the van, and a close-up of the license plate, says Ron Livermore, coordinator for instructional technology initiatives for the district, where 88 percent of students are Hispanic and 75 percent of students are economically disadvantaged.

"That's hard-core evidence," Livermore says. "It's normally hard to get a security officer and School Resource Officer [SRO] to gather information on the vehicle without him [the offender] catching on to what you're doing."

With the handheld, pictures were instantaneous and sent to the security people at the school, who were able to track down the vendor and his van via the SRO's resources, Livermore says.

The undercover officer also took photos of students buying the special cones. Before 3,000 Palms were put in the hands of administrators and on-campus security guards and SROs last year, students who were suspects for some problem in school would be pulled out of class, brought to the main office and asked questions where administrators would try to "scare" them to get the truth, Livermore says.

Now, the proof is on the Palm. Given that the Palms have all student information including photographs, which schools extract from the student photo ID system; nicknames; and class schedules, the students are dealt with immediately at the scene of the alleged crime.

"We're a very heavy handheld district," Livermore says. "It's a big rumor mill, that's what schools are. Someone heard from someone about what might happen. It's about immediacy. Now you have the immediacy of information. You really make the administrator the information manager. Before, they were bound to an antiquated system. Now they have resources to manage their time and information."

Using wireless technology--as in 802.11 network wireless, or full roaming network, which is embedded in a school buildings ceilings so laptops and handhelds can communicate without wires--and cell phones is still minimal but growing in American schools, according to Darrell Walery, who is a member of the CoSN Emerging Technologies Committee and director of technology, Nextel and IP wireless phones for security in District 230 in Overland Park, Ill., a Chicago suburb. The IP, or Internet Protocol, connection keeps information in real time because it can connect to a student database, he adds, as opposed to merely using wireless access cards in laptops or handhelds which do not give the most timely information and which can cause tech headaches. Using IP phones in District 230 schools allow administrators or nurses to directly dial 911, saving valuable seconds in case of a medical emergency, Walery explains.

Gangs Wired Shut

Given Ysleta's big gang population, administrators in 11 schools, mainly high schools, now have the luxury of Palm Treo 650s with Bluetooth and infrared wireless transmission, which sync to computers and can connect to printers. The goal is for every teacher to have one. Handhelds are used in the classroom as well as hallways, cafeterias, and sports fields using TruSmart's ScheduleFinder software, which compresses all student information including student attendance, grades, class schedules, discipline reports, nicknames, and photographs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Wireless Communication: Wireless Technologies, Particularly School Networks, Are a Small but Growing Trend in American Schools. and It's Keeping Students and Staff Safer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.