World Conference of Speakers of Parliaments

By Johnsson, Anders B. | UN Chronicle, September-November 2005 | Go to article overview

World Conference of Speakers of Parliaments


Johnsson, Anders B., UN Chronicle


Leaders of the world's parliaments met at UN Headquarters in New York from 7 to 9 September 2005 for the Second World Conference of Speakers of Parliaments, to bring their vision of multilateral cooperation to the hub of international politics. At the outset, the role of the institution of parliament is first and foremost a domestic one. These institutions are a diverse set, each zealously guarding its own independence and imbued with traditions, which in some cases date back more than a thousand years.

There is also a place for the leaders of parliaments in the UN General Assembly for various reasons. The first is a symbolic one. The Conference was held the week preceding the 2005 World Summit, with more than 150 Heads of State and Government attending. The presence of the speakers offered a timely reminder that democratic Governments are subject to the scrutiny of their parliaments and any decision of their leaders in the multilateral sphere will have to be debated in parliament if it is to be put into effect. Second, their presence in such a large number testified to a growing tendency within the international organizations to include parliaments in their affairs. At a time when the United Nations is in the throes of reform, the need for a more stringent democratic oversight of the work of multilateral organizations is being expressed more and more openly. Third and most importantly, it was a reflection of the changing agenda of the parliaments themselves.

The very first Conference of Speakers took place in 2000, on the eve of the Millennium Summit. Since then, the world has changed enormously. Tensions have been broken, often in very ugly forms. Across the board, there have been calls for more robust global governance, along with stronger democratic guarantees. Parliaments are directly concerned by these appeals. How should such intentions be translated into practical action? Not surprisingly, opinions differ. There are some who energetically champion a global parliamentary assembly, composed of parliamentarians initially delegated from their national assemblies and later directly elected, which would sit alongside the United Nations and scrutinize its affairs.

The view of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), convenor of the Conference, is more tempered. It makes little practical or political sense to set up a separate parliamentary assembly alongside the existing governmental General Assembly. The real priority is to ensure that there is better--i.e., closer, deeper, more systematic and sustained--cooperation between national parliaments and the United Nations in all its diversity. For this to happen, parliament members, whose work in parliamentary standing or select committees has given them expertise in specific international issues, must sit down with multilateral institutions to work out agreements. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

World Conference of Speakers of Parliaments
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.