Our Pupils Can't Even Use a Knife and Fork, Teachers Complain

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 14, 2006 | Go to article overview

Our Pupils Can't Even Use a Knife and Fork, Teachers Complain


Byline: By MOLLY WATSON Western Mail

Teachers across Wales are spending lunch breaks helping children cut up their food, because pupils haven't learnt how to use basic cutlery, it was revealed last night. According to teaching professionals the number of children who arrive at school lacking simple skills such as how to handle a knife and fork is rising dramatically. Previously, most children were taught how to use a knife and fork at home - but a greater reliance on junk food which can be eaten with fingers, and the decline of family meal times have meant children are becoming increasingly unfamiliar with basic table manners. Chris Howard, South Wales regional representative of the National Association of Head Teachers, said the trend has led schools to take on the responsibility for teaching these skills. He said, 'It's a by-product of lifestyle changes. Primary schools have been reporting it. In an ideal world parents ought to be teaching it at home but it's something that schools are having to compensate for and put right. It's something children need to know.' Rhys Williams, of NUT Cymru, said it was placing more pressure on teachers, and he added that the omission could hinder children's development - affecting their chances of future success. He said, 'A lot of children come to school behind in terms of the skills you expect. 'Teachers are remarkably flexible and have tremendous innovation but both these are being tested. 'There is a growing minority of children without these skills and it's unfair to teachers and to the children as it is not giving them the best start to their education. It hinders their social progress and holds up development at a very important stage.' Mr Williams said the problem was caused by 'fragmentation of the family'. 'Families don't eat together in the way they did a generation ago. People eat at different times in front of the television. 'Children learn by copying, so when they sit down alone they miss out.' John Tobutt, head teacher of Gabalfa Primary School in Cardiff, agreed. Mr Tobutt, who regularly supervises school lunches, said conversations with his pupils revealed many never sat down to a family meal. He said, 'It's certainly a known fact that children are coming to school not as prepared as they once were on a whole range of things. Being able to dress themselves or using a knife and fork is for some children very difficult to grasp. 'A great deal of time is being spent in key stage one lunch periods with midday supervisors helping children by cutting food up and this is certainly an issue for staff. 'They are employed to supervise children rather than actually cut up their food. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Our Pupils Can't Even Use a Knife and Fork, Teachers Complain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.