Bull Session; Pro Riders Must Stay on the Bucking Beasts for 8 Seconds* *That Can Feel like a Very Long Time

By Trauth, Erin | The Florida Times Union, February 3, 2006 | Go to article overview

Bull Session; Pro Riders Must Stay on the Bucking Beasts for 8 Seconds* *That Can Feel like a Very Long Time


Trauth, Erin, The Florida Times Union


Byline: ERIN TRAUTH

A brawny cowboy clutches a rope taut around his right hand, eyes wide open with a mix of fear and adrenaline. A crowd bellows in the background, many chanting the phrase "eight seconds" over and over again.

The cowboy signals for the chute to open in front of him for his first ride, and suddenly a ton of enraged bull bucks wildly beneath him. All the cowboy can do is raise one hand, hold on tight and try to last eight seconds on the back of one of the most intimidating animals on the planet.

This is the Professional Bull Riders tour at its finest -- and it's riding into action Saturday and Sunday at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena.

"There's really no way to simulate riding a 2,000 pound bull," said Justin McBride, the reigning 2005 PBR World Champion. "You just hope for the best."

Jacksonville is stop No. 9 on the Built Ford Tough Series, considered the major leagues for the sport of professional bull-riding. The top 45 cowboys in the world square off on the biggest, baddest bulls the country has to offer on a coast-to-coast, 31-stop tour. The bull riders compete week after week for individual event titles and for the season-long title of PBR World Champion. Each event awards a minimum of $80,000 in prize money to winning riders.

Riders in PBR are scored by the bull's exhibited difficulty and the rider's ability to match the moves of the bull beneath him with constant control and certain body positions. The rider must also stay on the bull for a full eight seconds to be awarded a score.

McBride is one cowboy ready to hold on -- he's back on the tour and is raring to win in Jacksonville. He tied for first place on last year's tour stop here with Brian Courson.

"If I didn't come back to win, I wouldn't have come back at all," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bull Session; Pro Riders Must Stay on the Bucking Beasts for 8 Seconds* *That Can Feel like a Very Long Time
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.