Humphrey May Be Back

By Dirocco, Michael | The Florida Times Union, February 3, 2006 | Go to article overview

Humphrey May Be Back


Dirocco, Michael, The Florida Times Union


Byline: MICHAEL DIROCCO

Florida men's basketball coach Billy Donovan didn't rule out the possibility that injured guard Lee Humphrey could play Saturday night against Kentucky.

Humphrey suffered a third-degree left shoulder separation last Sunday after falling off his bicycle, and Donovan said Monday that Humphrey would be out one to three weeks. But Donovan wouldn't say Thursday that Humphrey was out against the Wildcats.

"I believe Corey [Brewer] will play -- how productive I don't know. But Lee, I don't know," Donovan said. "He hasn't really done anything at all."

Humphrey suffered a torn ligament in his shoulder and received an anti-inflammatory injection Sunday night. The Southeastern Conference's leading 3-point shooter hasn't practiced since then, he but did make the trip to Mississippi with the Gators earlier this week.

"Apparently, it [the injury] is pretty common in football, [and] in football, it is without question you're out for three weeks because of the constant contact," Donovan said. "Outside of maybe someone coming down on a rebound on top of Lee's shoulder, there's not going to be a constant banging, so I'm hopeful to get him back as quickly as possible.

"The biggest thing with Lee is going to be his range of motion. When it happened, he could only get his arm up halfway. It's getting better. And then you got to go through the confidence issue. Does he feel comfortable going out there and playing and being productive?"

There isn't any uncertainty about Brewer, despite his lright ankle sprain developing into tendinitis. Brewer, who also is suffering from a cold, will play against Kentucky, but Donovan is unsure how much.

Since suffering the injury against Tennessee on Jan. 21, Brewer (12.1 ppg, 5.0 rpg) has scored just 10 points, grabbed three rebounds and committed eight turnovers in three games. He is unable to drive to the basket, which is the biggest part of his offensive game, and hasn't been as effective on defense because of his limited mobility.

"It's one of those things I just hope can get better and he can get back to playing because it's very, very obvious watching him play that he's not as reckless and daring and playing like he's capable of," Donovan said. "I think he'll play. The biggest thing for Corey is, is he going to be a productive player while he's out there? Can he do what he normally has been able to do? And he really hasn't been able to do that. …

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