Business and Housing a Strategic Mix

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 17, 2006 | Go to article overview

Business and Housing a Strategic Mix


Byline: Rebecca Boreczky, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Rockville is a gateway to international business. The city's strategic location next to Washington provides businesses with access to federal agencies, international organizations and embassies.

The Montgomery County community has completed two of five major developments mixing residential, retail, entertainment and office space. Rockville occupies 13.03 square miles, and a major portion of the Interstate 270 corridor is within the city's corporate limits, creating a residential community and an employment center where median home values have reached $403,488, according to the National Association of Realtors.

Home buyers will find a variety of housing styles, prices and neighborhoods from midrise condominiums to Victorian homes, from contemporary to traditional styles.

When one of Europe's leading space, defense and transportation companies took on the task of searching nationwide for a suitable home for its U.S. subsidiary, Rockville landed the company.

"We are delighted to have located our offices in Rockville, along the high-tech corridor," says Luis Mayo, CEO of the Madrid-based Grupo GMV. "We believe that this location makes good business sense and will allow for future growth of the company."

Some 100 international companies are located in Montgomery County. For Rockville, the launching of new companies and the expansion of established businesses translates into an increased tax base and revenue.

The Maryland Municipal League reports that Rockville is the fifth largest city in Maryland and one of the state's oldest, dating to Colonial America. Rockville was known as Hingerford's Tavern, the name of its most familiar landmark.

When Montgomery County was formed by a division of Frederick County in 1776, Hingerford's Tavern became the county seat and gradually became known as Montgomery Court House. In 1801, the Maryland General Assembly changed the name to Rockville because of its close proximity to Rock Creek.

Rockville remained small in its early years. By 1900, the population had risen to 1,110, and in 1940, the city limits were expanded and the population reached 2,047. During the next 40 years, Rockville grew quickly. By 1980, Rockville's population was nearly 45,000.

Rockville's historical and architectural value are nationally recognized: Its entire West Montgomery Avenue Historic District, the B&O Railroad Station, Old St. Mary's Church and cemetery, Wire Hardware Co., Dawson Farm and the Bringham-Brewer House are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Even though Rockville borders the I-270 Technology Corridor, it has maintained its small-town charm with four historic districts, brick sidewalks, mature trees and a Victorian county seat.

Rockville is a diversified community with a variety of neighborhoods, cultural arts, retail areas and high-tech and bio-tech companies.

Rockville also hosts a vibrant community of international scientists working at federal laboratories, as well as officials from international organizations and embassies.

There are three institutions of higher learning within the I-270 corridor - the Montgomery campus of Johns Hopkins University, University of Maryland at Shady Grove and Montgomery College.

Ten of Rockville's largest private employers are situated along the I-270 corridor and provide more than 6,500 jobs.

Nine major shopping centers give Rockville residents big-city convenience. Two of the three largest shopping centers are in the Rockville Pike corridor at Congressional Plaza and Congressional North. The third largest is Fallsgrove Village Center in Rockville's Town Center.

Rockville has 58 public parks, nine community recreation centers and a civic center park complex on 153 acres with a 500-seat F. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Business and Housing a Strategic Mix
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.