Cheney Joins Others Who've Put the Vice in Vice Presidency

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 16, 2006 | Go to article overview

Cheney Joins Others Who've Put the Vice in Vice Presidency


Byline: Burt Constable

Having our vice president shoot an old man in the face seemed a lot funnier before people started bringing up politics, questioning the way the story broke, giving interviews to Fox News and having buckshot-related heart attacks.

In his first public comments since Saturday's shooting of buddy Harry Whittington while quail hunting in Texas, Dick Cheney on Wednesday avoided saying something stupid such as, "I did not have shotgun relations with that lawyer."

Our vice president accepted responsibility, even if he remained defiant in his handling of the story, which didn't become public until the ranch owner called the local Texas paper the next day. Having apparently learned something from the administration's faulty justification for going to war in Iraq, Cheney insisted that he didn't want to rush such a "complicated story" onto the American public until he was sure it was accurate.

He also managed to give an interview to Brit Hume without uttering, "I'm sorry." Being Dick Cheney means never having to say you are sorry.

What he did say was: "You can't blame anybody else. I'm the guy who pulled the trigger and shot my friend."

This may have been the first time the former secretary of defense had seen a man get shot. As a member of the Nixon Administration during the Vietnam War, Cheney had more deferments (five) than John Kerry had Purple Hearts (three).

Cheney appeared shaken by the shooting, which clearly looks accidental, and Hume appeared sympathetic. If Vice President Al Gore had gone hunting during the Clinton years, shot somebody and waited four days to comment on it, I'm sure Hume, Rush Limbaugh and Republican pundits would have cut Gore some slack.

But the incident bolsters Cheney's already legendary status among the largely forgotten fraternity of U.S. vice presidents. The Yale dropout, who piled up two drunken driving convictions as a young adult, is colorful.

Cheney used the F-word on the Senate floor. His gay daughter became an issue to some. He joked with then-candidate George Bush in Naperville about a reporter he deemed a "big time" (swear). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cheney Joins Others Who've Put the Vice in Vice Presidency
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.