Labour-Intensive Growth Is Vital: The Last UN Peacekeeping Troops Pulled out of Sierra Leone at the End of 2005, Signalling an End to the Physical Intervention of outside Forces in the Country's Affairs. Can the Country, Now at Peace, Find the Right Economic Formula to Sustain Peace and Stability? Neil Ford Discusses

By Ford, Neil | African Business, February 2006 | Go to article overview

Labour-Intensive Growth Is Vital: The Last UN Peacekeeping Troops Pulled out of Sierra Leone at the End of 2005, Signalling an End to the Physical Intervention of outside Forces in the Country's Affairs. Can the Country, Now at Peace, Find the Right Economic Formula to Sustain Peace and Stability? Neil Ford Discusses


Ford, Neil, African Business


Sierra Leone has undoubtedly taken a series of important steps on the road to recovery. The civil war has ended and the disarmament process has proved an outstanding success. At the end of 2005, however, the last United Nations peacekeeping forces pulled out of the country and the Sierra Leonean security forces are now expected to stand on their own two feet. Can the civilian government survive in the long term and can it strengthen an economy that provides the country's only real chance of future stability?

[GRAPHIC OMITTED]

Despite a number of up and downs during their five-year stay in Sierra Leone, the United Nations forces have played a vital role in restoring civilian rule and bringing the culture of violence to an end. Unlike in some other UN peacekeeping operations, their withdrawal was not sudden but was planned well in advance, with Sierra Leonean forces gradually taking over their role following sustained investment in creating a new, more highly trained national army.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

UN troop numbers were gradually reduced until the last detachment of Pakistani soldiers left in mid-December. Where the national army was once restricted to small parcels of government held land, it is now active in all parts of the country following an intensive programme of training by British forces and renewed investment.

When hundreds of UN soldiers were taken prisoner by rebel forces in 2000, it was widely forecast that the Sierra Leone mission would end UN peacekeeping operations in Africa. Yet partly because of the subsequent intervention of British paratroopers in 2000 and 2001, the UN operation in the country is now being trumpeted as a massive success. What was once a collapsed state has now been given a realistic chance of long term success.

The improved security situation was confirmed in April last year, when the British Foreign Office announced that it considered all parts of Sierra Leone to be safe for travel. In a statement, it revealed: "We are no longer advising against travel to areas of Sierra Leone bordering Liberia due to improvements in the security situation." It continued: "Visits to the western area of Sierra Leone, including Freetown, are usually trouble free. Travel outside the western area can be difficult, as roads and infrastructure are poor." For a country that had been carved up into a series of petty fiefdoms only a few years ago, the announcement marked something of a breakthrough.

Outside support will now also be vital for economic reconstruction but this will only be forthcoming if the government manages to tackle corruption.

Freetown has budgeted for $950m expenditure over the next two years. A donors' conference held in London last November provided $800m, while raising concerns over government efforts to tackle financial irregularities.

President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah told delegates: "I am fully aware that the biggest concern for many of our development partners is the level of our commitment to fighting corruption and the manner in which we are able to provide demonstrable results in this area. We welcome this concern and wish to assure the donor community and our people that we take the fight against corruption very seriously."

Economic recovery

Despite such criticism, the Consultative Group for Sierra Leone, which comprised 30 donor countries, agreed to provide the money to support the government's poverty reduction strategy up to the end of 2007.

The World Bank has also cited some progress on the economic front. The economy has grown by an annual rate of 7% since the end of the civil war but most of this has merely been the result of rebounding from the decline of the civil war years. It will therefore take many years of growth at similar levels to make a real difference to living standards.

Diamond revenues are obviously important because of the foreign exchange that exports can earn. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Labour-Intensive Growth Is Vital: The Last UN Peacekeeping Troops Pulled out of Sierra Leone at the End of 2005, Signalling an End to the Physical Intervention of outside Forces in the Country's Affairs. Can the Country, Now at Peace, Find the Right Economic Formula to Sustain Peace and Stability? Neil Ford Discusses
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.