NIJ Service Provides Valuable Corrections Construction Data

Corrections Today, July 1993 | Go to article overview

NIJ Service Provides Valuable Corrections Construction Data


The National Institute of Justice Construction Information Exchange offers a number of services to help corrections officials plan, finance, design and build new prisons and jails. Among the services the network offers are:

* information from a newly completed questionnaire on criminal justice complex facilities and facilities serving special needs inmates;

* a construction data base featuring more than 500 listings nationwide; and

* the Construction Reference and Referral Service.

Construction

Questionnaire

A recent survey collected new information from criminal justice facilities across the nation. Questionnaires returned by corrections officials and architects reveal new data in two key areas: (1) detention and holding facilities with law enforcement or court components located within the same complex, and (2) facilities that serve special inmate populations such as drug offenders, women, the elderly and inmates infected with HIV.

In addition, the questionnaire results include information on land acquisition costs, equipment and furnishings costs, site development costs, financing methods and facility locations.

Federal, state and local officials can use the data to build on the experiences of others in developing well-designed, cost-effective prisons and jails.

Construction

Data Base

The construction data base now includes information on more than 500 facilities nationwide. This service includes information ranging from design concepts, construction costs and financing methods to staffing levels, cell capacity, inmate profiles and operational costs. It also lists administrators, sheriffs, architects and other professionals who recently have completed a prison or jail project. Updated regularly, the data base has more than doubled in size to keep pace with new developments in prison and jail construction.

Reference and Referral

The Construction Reference and Referral Service allows criminal justice professionals to share their experiences in managing prison and jail crowding.

The service provides a team of specialists who locate answers to questions or refer inquiries to knowledgeable sources. Special areas of assistance include:

Conference services. Staff refer planners of corrections-related conferences and meetings to resources they can use to publicize an event. In addition, an NIJ representative may be available to attend conferences and show participants how to use the resources of the Construction Information Exchange in their corrections practice.

Other conference-related services include providing NIJ materials for inclusion in conference registration packets, supplying reading lists and fact sheets designed to complement a program, and offering access to a variety of specialized or customized mailing lists.

The National Directory of Corrections Construction. This directory provides the information contained in NIJ's construction data base in a book format. It lists selected information on each facility in a two-page profile that includes floor plans.

Construction Bulletins. These periodicals highlight critical corrections issues and provide case studies of selected construction projects. Construction Bulletins demonstrate new building techniques, creative partnerships and financing methods that save time and money. …

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NIJ Service Provides Valuable Corrections Construction Data
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