First Center to Study Accounting Ethics Opens

Journal of Accountancy, October 1993 | Go to article overview

First Center to Study Accounting Ethics Opens


The first center in the United States devoted to the study of ethics in the accounting profession launched its major programs this term at Binghamton University of the State University of New York.

"We're cosponsoring the first research conference in accounting ethics with Ernst & Young, we're developing unique training programs to foster the ethical reasoning skills practitioners need and we've just launched Research on Accounting Ethics, the first ethics journal in accounting," said Lawrence Poneman, director of the Center for the Study of Ethics and Behavior in Accounting (CEBA).

CEBA is needed, asserted Poneman, also an associate professor of accounting and Arthur Andersen Teaching Fellow at Binghamton University, because the "ethical core" of the accounting profession has come under close scrutiny in the wake of the explosion of litigation targeting accounting firms, the recession, the demise of Laventhol and Horwath, the savings and loan crisis and similar developments.

Misleading perceptions. To overcome the often misguided public perception of accountants' culpability in these developments, the profession is modifying and improving its ethical standards for practitioners and CPA firms. The increased emphasis on ethics has resulted in revised codes of professional conduct for auditors and management accountants as well as new internal and external auditing standards.

As businesses become more complex," Poneman said, "the likelihood of ethics, integrity and credibility problems grows. As a result, accounting professionals increasingly are expected to be not only technical experts but ethical experts as well."

But what does being an ethical expert mean in the real world? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

First Center to Study Accounting Ethics Opens
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.