Computer 'Madness' as Education Chiefs Surrender on Literacy; PUPILS GIVEN SOFTWARE TO READ AND SPELL FOR THEM

Daily Mail (London), February 21, 2006 | Go to article overview

Computer 'Madness' as Education Chiefs Surrender on Literacy; PUPILS GIVEN SOFTWARE TO READ AND SPELL FOR THEM


Byline: GRAHAM GRANT

CHILDREN will no longer be required to spell properly at school, in a move labelled 'complete madness' by critics.

Instead, pupils are being allowed to use computers with an electronic 'voice' that reads out text for them.

School bosses say the technology, designed originally for blind people, allows pupils to 'bypass' literacy problems so they can keep up with their classmates.

But last night education chiefs in Edinburgh - who described the scheme as 'moving with the times' - were accused of 'running up the white flag' and giving up on attempts to improve pupils' literacy standards.

Forty per cent of 13-year-olds in Scottish schools are falling short of literacy and numeracy guidelines, according to Scottish Executive figures.

Now it is feared the reliance on computers will undermine pupils' reading and writing skills in the same way as children's mental arithmetic ability has been eroded by widespread use of classroom calculators.

Last night Nick Seaton, of the Campaign for Real Education, said: 'This is absolutely ridiculous and will be seen as complete madness by concerned parents.

'Why are we running up the white flag and going backwards like this in the 21st century? This approach will be extremely damaging for children.'

Education bosses at the City of Edinburgh Council said promoting literacy was important, particularly in primary schools, but said teachers should not 'drop everything to achieve that'.

Alison Waugh, at the council's children and families department, said many children were struggling by the end of primary school to spell and read properly.

She said: 'One thing we can do to help, as well as finding other ways of improving literacy, is to bypass these difficulties so pupils can access the curriculum in an equal way to other children.

'We have programs that can help children to learn independently.' Mrs Waugh said these included 'screen readers' - software allowing computers to read out texts such as Internet material needed for schoolwork - so the child does not have to read.

Pupils can also use 'predictive' software, which means that if they enter a wrong spelling, the computer automatically corrects it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Computer 'Madness' as Education Chiefs Surrender on Literacy; PUPILS GIVEN SOFTWARE TO READ AND SPELL FOR THEM
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.