DJ Johnny Is Backing Our Campaign for Safer Stations

The Evening Standard (London, England), February 23, 2006 | Go to article overview

DJ Johnny Is Backing Our Campaign for Safer Stations


Byline: ALEXA BARACAIA

CAPITAL RADIO DJ Johnny Vaughan is backing the Evening Standard's campaign for safer stations in London.

Starting tomorrow, the breakfast show host will urge listeners to sign our online petition calling for London's unmanned stations to be staffed all the time trains are running.

News bulletins throughout the day will also highlight the issue and a special edition of the Jeremy Kyle show on Sunday night will be devoted to the safety of rail passengers in the capital.

Our campaign was launched following the murder last month of lawyer Tom ap Rhys Pryce minutes after he left Kensal Green station.

We revealed how 229 stations in London were left unmanned late at night and that experts estimated it would cost just [pounds sterling]4million a year to provide night-time security - at a time when the 10 private rail companies are making [pounds sterling]130million a year in profits.

Chiltern, which carries 30,000 passengers a day in and out of Marylebone, has ordered the stations it is responsible for to be staffed at night and Mayor Ken Livingstone has said that from next year, 50 Silverlink stations will be staffed whenever trains are running.

Vaughan, 39, who lives in Fulham with his wife Antonia and children Tabitha, five, and Rafferty, two, said: "I want my friends and family to feel safe.

London's a great city and it shouldn't be impossible to make our railway stations safe.

We have to push the train companies to put this at the top of the agenda."

His co-host Zoe Hanson, 30, who lives in south London, said: "It is so important that train companies realise the risk they put commuters at by having stations unmanned. …

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