Critic's Choice Top Five Exhibitions

The Evening Standard (London, England), February 23, 2006 | Go to article overview

Critic's Choice Top Five Exhibitions


Byline: HEPHZIBAH ANDERSON

Tropicalia: A Revolution in Brazilian Culture Barbican Art Gallery, EC2 While the 1960s in Britain were swinging, over the ocean in Brazil, art and music, politics and fashion were all being influenced by another revolutionary movement - Tropicalia, an anarchic explosion of creativity that, even with the benefit of hindsight, refuses to conform to tidy definitions. This ambitious survey reels in more than 250 exhibits, from works by key artists including Antonio Dias and Lygia Pape to album covers and advertising. New visual and sound commissions demonstrate its continuing role as a source of inspiration to a new generation. (0845 120 7550). Until Sun 21 May.

Americans in Paris 1860-1900 National Gallery, W1 Decades before Parisian je ne sais quoi began luring America's authors across the Atlantic, the city that gave birth to Impressionism became a mecca for its artists. Among the Americans who made the pilgrimage were painters Whistler, John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt, whose elegant portraits and light-filled landscapes help to show how their art was changed by their French sojourn. Look out for Madame X, Sargent's dramatic and suggestive portrait of society girl Virginie Gautreau, which caused a scandal when first exhibited at the 1884 Paris Salon.(020 7747 2885). Until Sun 21 May.

Anna Piaggi: Fashion-ology Victoria & Albert Museum, SW7 A veteran setter and spotter of trends, Anna Piaggi is also a muse, self-styled icon and fashion reporter, and this adoring exhibition is the style equivalent of a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame. …

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