Standards Issued for Government ID Cards; Biometric Data to Be Collected from Federal Employees, Contractors

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 24, 2006 | Go to article overview

Standards Issued for Government ID Cards; Biometric Data to Be Collected from Federal Employees, Contractors


Byline: Jennifer Harper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The National Institutes of Standards and Technology has issued the final specifications for standardized Personal Identity Verification cards required for all federal employees and civilian contractors by Oct. 27.

The cards - which use biometric data such as fingerprints, retinal scans, facial recognition and other smart technology - are under development in response to Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12, an order issued in 2004 by President Bush for mandatory, standard governmentwide IDs.

"The standards are in place. Several vendors have developed cards which are now being tested for compliance with those guidelines," said Curt Baker, manager of the PIV program at the standards agency, adding that the production timetable is in the hands of the General Services Administration.

The cards themselves are intended as a marvel of security and practicality, granting personnel access to any federal building or information system nationwide. PIV technology incorporates holograms, bar codes, microprinting and encrypted computer chips, which include signatures and personal demographic information, according to Identity Alliance, a private Indiana-based security firm.

"These standards will usher in a new generation of smart PIV cards that will work the same across all federally secured facilities," said company spokesman David Corcoran, who calls PIV cards a "personal information vault" and thinks they will have plenty of effect in the private sector as well. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Standards Issued for Government ID Cards; Biometric Data to Be Collected from Federal Employees, Contractors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.