The Gift of Art: For Jewelry Designers, Finding the Right Retail Store Is Crucial

By Duggins, Kamilah C. | Black Enterprise, January 2006 | Go to article overview

The Gift of Art: For Jewelry Designers, Finding the Right Retail Store Is Crucial


Duggins, Kamilah C., Black Enterprise


HUBBARD FACES TOUGH CHALLENGES IN HER SEARCH FOR A BUYER.

When Wanda Hubbard decided to leave San Francisco and re-route her life in 2001, she was ready for a complete career makeover. After a 20-year career working in various capacities for nonprofit organizations, Hubbard returned to Massachusetts and briefly considered the idea of finding a "real" job. Instead, she began taking jewelry design classes to explore an artistic path that she had neglected for years. "My friends always told me I was creative and that I needed to tap into that energy," Hubbard explains, "I knew I needed to either do it now or never."

Within a year of reading books, taking classes, and experimenting with different materials, Hubbard, 58, wrote a business plan for her jewelry line, Sasse. By 2003, Hubbard had everything up and running. However, Sasse has boasted only modest success. In 2004, revenues totaled $9,000 and projected earnings for this year are $14,000.

After a few years working the festival and craft fair circuit, Hubbard realized that if she was to survive in this business, she would have to sell to retail stores. However, that has been more challenging than developing Sasse.

"There is no scientific method to it," says Helena Krodel, spokesperson for the Jewelry Information Center, a trade association for jewelry designers and manufacturers. Designers can hire a sales rep or they can pound the pavement themselves to get an appointment with buyers, but "it's hard to do because buyers are constantly inundated with designers trying to show them their work. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Gift of Art: For Jewelry Designers, Finding the Right Retail Store Is Crucial
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.