Washington Outlook

By Gray, Gerry | American Forests, Winter 2006 | Go to article overview

Washington Outlook


Gray, Gerry, American Forests


The most significant--and much anticipated--forestry legislation of 2005 emerged late in the year as House and Senate members introduced bills on forest restoration or recovery following significant natural disturbances, such as wildfires, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, and insect or disease outbreaks. The introduction of three bills in October and November kicked off a debate on specific legislative proposals for addressing a set of important issues, some of them controversial, related to "post-disturbance" forest restoration.

Congress began to explore post-wildfire, or post-disturbance, forest restoration during the summer of 2004 in hearings initiated by the House Resources Committee's Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health. It was generally felt that Congress had dealt with many pre-wildfire issues related to forest restoration when it passed the Healthy Forests Restoration Act (HFRA) at the end of 2003. Title I of HFRA provided new authorities for hazardous fuels reduction projects to protect communities and forest ecosystems from the threat of destructive wildfires.

AMERICAN FORESTS submitted testimony for one of the initial hearings (see Washington Outlook, Autumn 2004) in which we expressed concerns about post-wildfire reforestation. We questioned the accuracy of current data on reforestation needs after wildfires, the increasing backlog of reforestation needs on federal lands, and the amount of funding available for post-fire reforestation and other restoration activities.

One of our major concerns was that Congress and federal agencies had directed so much attention to emergency wildfire suppression and hazardous fuel reduction activities in recent years that post-fire needs were being neglected, due both to immediate policy priorities and limited resources. We emphasized the importance of understanding ecological effects of increasingly large and intense wildfires and of providing appropriate restoration treatments where forests and their ecosystem services were at risk.

The most controversial post-disturbance restoration issues relate to salvage logging. Some see salvage logging as an essential activity in rehabilitating and regenerating forests and believe that salvage timber sales can provide a critical source of revenue to help cover the costs of restoration treatments. Others see it as an activity that often causes further environmental damage on disturbed forest sites, one done primarily for economic purposes. Due to limited scientific evidence on the environmental effects of salvage sales, there is much room for disagreement. And, due to the recent historical conflict over salvage sales, related to the so-called "salvage rider" of 1995, there remains a significant amount of political distrust.

Rep. Tom Udall (D-NM), ranking minority member on the House Resources forests subcommittee, introduced the first bill on October 6, the "National Forests Rehabilitation and Recovery Act of 2005" (HR 3973). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Washington Outlook
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.