A Head Start for Micky's Psychology Sessions; DAVID WARDALE'S TONGUE-IN-CHEEK LOOK AT COVENTRY CITY Picture Gag Number Two in a Series of Two - We Promise!

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), March 4, 2006 | Go to article overview

A Head Start for Micky's Psychology Sessions; DAVID WARDALE'S TONGUE-IN-CHEEK LOOK AT COVENTRY CITY Picture Gag Number Two in a Series of Two - We Promise!


Byline: DAVID WARDALE

MICKY ADAMS reckons he's found a way to address City's woeful away record this season - by using psychology.

True to Coventry form, the club can't afford to employ a proper sports psychologist.

"I am the sports psychologist," Adams told the CET this week.

And what of Micky's methods?

"The players will tell you that I have questioned them..." he said.

But there's a little more to sports psychology than that.

Sky Blue Saturday is happy to offer Micky the following guide to sports psychology FREE OF CHARGE. And if City don't win at Southampton today, he can have his money back.

Most practitioners will tell you that there are five basic skills that sports psychologists teach: relaxation' concentration' imagery' monitoring self-talk and developing a mental routine.

Let's examine these five skills in more detail.

RELAXATION

STRESS is a major cause of under-performance in sport.

Micky needs to ease the burden on his players by making them train for no more than three or four mornings a week while using their 'me time' to explore other interests such as golf, gambling addiction and lap dancing clubs.

CONCENTRATION

THIS enables the mind to talk to the body, controlling its functions and maximising performance.

Fatigue is the main enemy of concentration, so Micky needs to ensure that no player plays more than twice a week for no more than 90 minutes at a time.

The crowd has a part to play here too - concentration will be maximised if fans do not shout, swear or stand up during games. Ideally, supporters should make no noise whatsoever for fear of putting the players off or annoying the managing director.

IMAGERY

PLAYERS can realise their full potential by mentally picturing attainable sporting goals.

For instance, the strikers may wish to imagine a cow's backside being pummelled by a banjo.

And Dennis Wise can picture the match official handing him his cards and whistle and letting him get on with refereeing the game.

MONITORING SELF-TALK

SELF-TALK is best explained by a sporting example: every time a basketball player goes to the free-throw line, you can see him talking to himself prior to his shot. …

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