2005 Was Not a Very Good Year

The Public Manager, Winter 2005 | Go to article overview

2005 Was Not a Very Good Year


The year just passed was not the best of times. Depending on your political bent, it might not have been the worst of times, but it certainly would not be a year you would plan to mark in your scrapbook to revisit. And for the president, it was a particularly bad year--and it was only the first year of his second term. If "lame duckness" were a political virtue, then this president has achieved the highest of the high in the shortest time in recent history.

Mesopotamia--Then and Now

But first, let's take a brief trip down memory lane. The Iraq war dragged on with no discernable progress other than the increase in the number of American and Iraqi deaths. There was a vote on their constitution, but after 5,000 years of tradition where democracy was Greek to this desert country, one vote cannot provoke much optimism. To be sure, the Code of Hammurabi came from this region, but memories for other than current slights seem lost. We had Abu Ghraib, where the virtue of women in the military was made apparent as they were deployed by the CIA to degrade our prisoners. Imagine, men who were ready to martyr themselves by strapping bombs to their chests cowering in front of young women guards posing with thumbs up. A new super-weapon has been unleashed!

And to compound the Iraq problem, Representative John Murtha of Pennsylvania called for the recall of the troops. Immediately, this decorated Marine was called a coward by the non-veteran Bush Administration only to recant the very next day when the dishonor of this attack became apparent even to the speakers of this insult. (Whew!! That was a bit over the top.)

Other Disasters at Home and Abroad

And 2005 was a year of natural disasters. There were the tsunamis in Indonesia, where we were able to provide immediate relief. This was contrasted with the days and days it took to mount a response to Katrina in our own country. Was Grimaldi the only one surprised to learn what a great job Michael Brown, now defrocked head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, did for the citizens in New Orleans as he stated under oath at a House hearing?? He must have been very good indeed, because he was kept on as a consultant for months after the debacle that was the federal response. And late in the year he opened a consulting firm offering expert services in what else but EMERGENCY PLANNING!! One has to ask if the mission statement deals with the emergency that occurs AFTER one's ineptness is exposed to the American public or something else. Grimaldi never ceases to be amazed at the over-reaching of the inept in Washington.

Another form of natural disaster was the natural and automatic consequence in politics of hubris. Whether it was Scooter Libby spreading the name of a Central Intelligence Agency operative or Majority Leader DeLay's colleague, Michael Scanlon, who took millions from Indian tribes to lobby about casinos for them by sending the powerful to Scotland to play golf. That probably has as much to do with Native American interests as the casinos themselves have to do with preserving their culture. And let's not leave Vice President Cheney's friends at Halliburton and its subsidiary Brown and Root out of this category. These huge firms were the willing recipients of billions of no-bid contracts, as if these are the only firms in the country who are capable of overspending taxpayers' money.

Sporting News

In the world of sport, the owner of the Redskins had them on a coaching carousel--four coaches in five years--that led the team to the lower ranks of the National Football League. But then he stumbled on a solution: rehire their last successful coach! Now the most valuable franchise in the league has made the playoffs, at least the first round. But will the grumblings begin anew if the Redskins fall from grace next year? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

2005 Was Not a Very Good Year
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.