Mohammed's Looney Toons: The Recent Cartoon Controversy Illuminates Muslim Intolerance for Debate and the Danger of a Growing Islamic Population in the West

By Kirkwood, R. Cort | The New American, March 6, 2006 | Go to article overview

Mohammed's Looney Toons: The Recent Cartoon Controversy Illuminates Muslim Intolerance for Debate and the Danger of a Growing Islamic Population in the West


Kirkwood, R. Cort, The New American


Flemming Rose, an editor at Jyllands-Posten, a Danish newspaper, sure can pick a fight. Rose is the man who published the dirty dozen cartoons of Mohammed, one of them featuring his turban shaped like a bomb, that sent Muslims everywhere into February's fine fury.

The gibbering over whether they should have been published aside, the episode is an unnerving commentary on European immigration policies. But perhaps Western political and cultural elites, who subverted Christianity and its culture with one hand and promoted its hostile and historic nemesis with the other, have finally learned something.

In their effort to erase the old moral order, they may have created a bigger problem than they bargained for. In their cities. In their towns. In their streets. It is rising Islam.

The Rage

Rose worries about Islam and its dampening effect on the vigorous exchange of ideas. He published the unflattering cartoons depicting Mohammed in September, supposedly because Danish artists were terrified of illustrating a children's biography of Mohammed. A Norwegian publication reprinted them, and the smoldering coal of Muslim malice toward everything Western burst into a global wildfire.

A dozen people died in Afghanistan, and five more died in Pakistan. Radical Muslims not only boycotted Danish products, but also attacked the Danish embassy in Tehran with Molotov cocktails, attacked Danish consulates, and rioted in Pakistan. An Iranian newspaper solicited mocking cartoons about the Holocaust. In Kabul, Afghanistan, the Washington Post reported, protestors attacked United Nations vehicles and property and shouted such slogans as "down with the USA," "down with Jews," "down with the Christians!" and "long live Islam!"

Raging street radicals attacked a U.S. consulate in Indonesia and American military bases in Afghanistan. In the United States, where nothing happened because we are not besieged by radical Muslim immigrants, some newspapers, including the Philadelphia Inquirer, published the cartoons. Muslims shook their fists outside the Inquirer when it published them.

Surprisingly, major European capitals are not ablaze, given that disgruntled Muslims recently torched part of Paris and that the Koran supposedly forbids graven images of Islam's prophets. Some observers say it does; others aver that Islamic art and history is rife with them. Whatever the case, observers rightly note that militant imams, using the Internet and cell phones, abetted the bedlam.

What It Means

Mohammedanism is again unmasked. Provocateurs certainly egged the masses on, but the masses acted, ultimately, on their own. If this many Muslims are so handily twiddled into a feral rage, Europe's and America's immigration policies are suicidal. Far too many Muslims are inclined to answer any slight, real or imagined, with violence, mayhem, and murder--or threats to commit them. Islam is organically intolerant of dissent. The riots and killings over the cartoons prove the incapacity for large numbers of Muslims to assimilate into Western society.

For anyone who understands the effects of language, culture, and religion on nationhood, the immigrationist proposition that Muslims are interchangeable with Danes or Americans has always been self-evidently absurd. Being an American or a Dane or a Briton for that matter, which usually makes one a Christian at least culturally and temperamentally, means you don't toss Molotov cocktails at embassies in one country because you don't like a cartoon published in another. Christian clerics in New York and Los Angeles don't issue death warrants for uppity novelists or murder blasphemous movie producers. Real Christians don't murder in the name of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, although they are often tricked into war for the spreading of "democracy."

A recent case in point: the outrage (and restraint) of Polish Catholics over the sacrilegious depiction of the sacred Black Madonna and Child icon by a pop-culture magazine. …

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