Self-Determination Skills and Opportunities of Transition-Age Youth with Emotional Disturbance and Learning Diabilities

By Carter, Erik W.; Lane, Kathleen L. et al. | Exceptional Children, Spring 2006 | Go to article overview

Self-Determination Skills and Opportunities of Transition-Age Youth with Emotional Disturbance and Learning Diabilities


Carter, Erik W., Lane, Kathleen L., Pierson, Melinda R., Glaeser, Barbara, Exceptional Children


The importance of promoting self-among determination among adolescents with disabilities has been highlighted in recent legislative, policy, and funding initiatives (Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, 2004; National Council on Disability, 2004; President's Commission on Excellence in Special Education, 2002; Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1992 and 1998) and garnered substantial attention in the published literature (e.g., Algozzine, Browder, Karvonen, Test, & Wood, 2001; Malian & Nevin, 2002). Moreover, research is accruing steadily that suggests that enhanced self-determination may play a role in improving student outcomes, including academic performance (Martin et al., 2003), employment status (Wehmeyer & Palmer, 2003), postsecondary participation (Field, Sarver, & Shaw, 2003), independence (Sowers & Powers, 1995), and quality of life (Wehmeyer & Schwartz, 1997). As a result, promoting students' self-determination now constitutes an important component of best practices in the education of transition-age youth with disabilities (e.g., Council for Exceptional Children, 2003; Field & Hoffman, 2002; Field, Martin, Miller, Ward, & Wehmeyer, 1998).

Successful postschool transitions require that adolescents assume more prominent roles in educational and life planning--understanding and communicating their strengths and needs, setting and working toward self-selected goals, advocating for themselves, and self-assessing their own progress and outcomes. Such actions characterize people who are self-determined and are presumed to improve adolescents' prospects for achieving personally meaningful outcomes (Field et al., 1998). Despite considerable efforts directed toward understanding and increasing the self-determination of adolescents with intellectual disabilities and learning disabilities, far less is known about the self-determination of high school students with emotional disturbance (ED). To illustrate, recent research reviews indicated that youth with ED represented less than 2% of participants in studies examining the impact of student involvement in educational planning (Test et al., 2004) and less than 4% of participants in studies evaluating the effectiveness of interventions aimed at promoting self-determination (Algozzine et al., 2001). Additional research is needed to address several gaps associated with the literature concerning the self-determination of students with ED.

Descriptive data addressing the skills, knowledge, and perceptions of students with ED in the area of self-determination would assist researchers and practitioners in (a) identifying specific areas of strength and need, (b) developing instructional objectives and curricular materials, and (c) designing effective intervention efforts to increase self-determined behavior. The in- and postschool outcomes of adolescents with ED--outcomes that generally are worse than for any other disability category--serve as indicators that students may exhibit substantial skill deficits in the area of self-determination (e.g., Wagner, Cameto, & Newman, 2003; Wood & Cronin, 1999). However, clear descriptive data addressing the self-determination of adolescents with ED remain absent from the literature. Few peer-reviewed studies have assessed the self-determination of high school students with ED and, of those that have included participants with ED, it is not possible to extract the ratings of these students from the larger sample (e.g., Houchins, 2002).

Research on the self-determination of adolescents with ED would be strengthened when accompanied by comparisons to youth receiving special education services under other disability categories, particularly students with learning disabilities (LD). In many schools, students with ED and LD may be served by the same teachers and/or in similar classroom settings (Carlson, Brauen, Klein, Schroll, & Westat, 2002; Sabornie & deBettencourt, 2004). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Self-Determination Skills and Opportunities of Transition-Age Youth with Emotional Disturbance and Learning Diabilities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.