Featured Article Quiz #5: "Usage and Data Collection Patterns for a Novel Web-Based Foodborne-Disease Surveillance System"

By Wethington, Holly | Journal of Environmental Health, March 2006 | Go to article overview

Featured Article Quiz #5: "Usage and Data Collection Patterns for a Novel Web-Based Foodborne-Disease Surveillance System"


Wethington, Holly, Journal of Environmental Health


Available to NEHA members only, the JEH Quiz, offered six times per calendar year through the Journal of Environmental Health, is a convenient tool for self-assessment and an easily accessible means to accumulate continuing-education (CE) credits toward maintaining your NEHA credentials.

It's a simple process....

1. Read the featured article carefully.

2. Select the correct answer to each JEH Quiz question.

3. a) Complete the online quiz at www.neha.org (click on "Continuing Education"),

b) Fax the quiz to (303) 691-9490, or

c) Mail the completed quiz to JEH Quiz, NEHA, 720 S. Colorado Blvd., Suite 970-S, Denver, CO 80246.

Be sure to include your name and membership number!

4. One CE credit will be applied to your account with an effective date of March 1, 2006 (first day of issue).

5. Check your continuing-education account online at www.neha.org.

6. You're on your way to earning CE hours!

Quiz deadline: June 1, 2006

[GRAPHIC OMITTED]

1. How many deaths does CDC estimate occur annually in the United States from foodborne illnesses?

a. 1,000.

b. 5,000.

c. 15,000.

2. How much are foodborne illnesses estimated to cost the United States annually?

a. $5 million.

b. $5 billion.

c. $23 billion.

3. Of the following populations, which one is not especially vulnerable?

a. Pregnant women.

b. The elderly.

c. Immunocompromised people.

d. Young adults.

4. How many illnesses does CDC estimate occur annually in the United States from foodborne illnesses?

a. 25 million.

b. 51 million.

c. 76 million.

5. What is the typical pathway of a foodborne-illness report?

a. Individual becomes ill[right arrow] seeks medical attention[right arrow] doctor contacts local health department (LHD)[right arrow] LHD investigates[right arrow] LHD puts report into state tally[right arrow] CDC receives state reports.

b. Individual becomes ill[right arrow] calls LHD[right arrow] LHD investigates[right arrow] LHD puts report into state tally[right arrow] CDC receives state reports.

c. Individual becomes ill[right arrow] calls CDC[right arrow] CDC investigates[right arrow] CDC puts report into state tally.

d. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Featured Article Quiz #5: "Usage and Data Collection Patterns for a Novel Web-Based Foodborne-Disease Surveillance System"
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.