Smoldered-Earth Policy: Created by Ancient Amazonian Natives, Fertile, Dark Soils Retain Abundant Carbon

By Harder, B. | Science News, March 4, 2006 | Go to article overview

Smoldered-Earth Policy: Created by Ancient Amazonian Natives, Fertile, Dark Soils Retain Abundant Carbon


Harder, B., Science News


Shortly after the U.S. Civil War, a research expedition encountered a group of Confederate expatriates living in Brazil. The refugees had quickly taken to growing sugarcane on plots of earth that were darker and more fertile than the surrounding soil, Cornell University's Charles Hartt noted in the 1870s.

The same dark earth, terra preta in Portuguese, is now attracting renewed scientific attention for its high productivity, mysterious past, and capacity to store carbon. Researchers on Feb. 18 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in St. Louis presented evidence that new production of the fertile soil could aid agriculture and limit global greenhouse-gas emissions.

Prehistoric farmers created dark earth, perhaps intentionally, when they worked charcoal and nutrient-rich debris into Amazonian soils, which are naturally poor at holding nutrients. The amendments produced "better nutrient retention and soil fertility," says soil scientist Johannes Lehmann of Cornell.

Charcoal forms when organic matter smolders, or burns at low temperatures and with limited oxygen. Nutrients such as phosphorus and potassium readily adhere to charcoal, and the combination creates a good habitat for microorganisms. The soil microbes transform the materials into dark earth, says geographer William I. woods of the University of Kansas in Lawrence.

If some of today's Amazonian farmers were to use smoldering fires to produce dark earth rather than clear fields with common slash-and-burn methods, they "would not only dramatically improve soil and increase crop production but also could provide a long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide," says Lehmann. …

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Smoldered-Earth Policy: Created by Ancient Amazonian Natives, Fertile, Dark Soils Retain Abundant Carbon
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