Rules Should Apply to Federal Forests, Too

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), March 30, 2006 | Go to article overview

Rules Should Apply to Federal Forests, Too


Byline: GUEST VIEWPOINT By Warren Weathers and Maureen Weathers For The Register-Guard

Our family-owned forest and the years of work we've invested improving wildlife habitat and forest health are being destroyed by insects invading from adjacent national forest lands.

These insect outbreaks, while initially manageable, have been allowed to explode as a result of the federal government's inability to take emergency action. Adoption of Rep. Greg Walden's Forest Emergency Recovery and Research Act could prevent problems like this.

Three years ago, the Silver Complex fire burned 200,000 acres of the Fremont National Forest. Onerous federal regulations have prevented the Forest Service from intervening to stem the disaster by removing the dead and dying timber - food and shelter for bark beetles.

As a consequence, the mountain pine beetle population has flourished along the southern edge of the Silver Complex fire, killing virtually all lodgepole pine larger than 4 inches in diameter, then moving into Ponderosa pine after all susceptible lodgepole is killed. Locals now refer to the upper Sycan River area as `the Red Forest." The resulting massive fuel loads inevitably will produce yet another 200,000-acre fire.

The `Red Forest' beetle epidemic has spread 15 miles south of the Silver Complex burn and now surrounds our family forest. As the mountain pine beetles' federal food supply is consumed, they fly across the national forest boundary and attack our trees.

Unfortunately, the only way to stop the beetles' spread is to cut down the tree that is under attack while the insect is still beneath its bark. We can't legally cut down infested federal trees, so we can't protect our family forest from the horde of insects breeding on the neighboring federal land. We can't recover the value of the trees we are forced to harvest prematurely, because Forest Service road use fees make uneconomic the cost to salvage, and the infestation will not wait for log prices to improve.

However, if we don't salvage the lodgepole before the beetles kill it, it will burn when the inevitable firestorm ignites the thousands of acres of beetle-killed trees on the adjacent national forest. This coming fire also will destroy all of the remaining green trees on our family forest, including white fir, whitebark pine and the lodgepole seedlings and saplings too small to be food for the beetle. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rules Should Apply to Federal Forests, Too
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.