Time to Think about the Great Outdoors

The Journal (Newcastle, England), April 8, 2006 | Go to article overview

Time to Think about the Great Outdoors


Winter's high winds and low temperatures have probably wreaked havoc with your patch of garden, whether it's postage stamp or football pitch size.

So now is a good time to be thinking about how you would like it to look in those crazy, hazy, lazy days of summer when, if you are not basking, you are barbecuing.

But don't just plunge straight into things without a bit of planning. Stand back, take stock and decide how you would like it to look. Because, by combing both mind and a modicum of muscle, things can take on an amazingly new dimension.

There are all sorts of avenues you can go down and with some sound advice from your local builders merchant, DIY store or garden centre, you can create some stunning effects for a comparatively modest outlay.

Timber decking, for instance, continues to be a popular feature.

It can be particularly effective as an alighting point when you step from your patio door into the garden.

Depending on what size you aim to create, there are decking kits to suit every requirement.

If you make sure the timber is pressure-treated to face the rigours of a British climate, it should provide many years of enjoyable service where you can sit, eat and drink, just watching nature go by.

You can spend as much or as little as you like to make you garden come alive.

For instance a few strategically placed earthenware pots with appropriate plants or shrubs and a few handfuls of scattered shingle, can provide an interesting focal point.

Indeed, part of the fun of improving your garden is planning how you want it to look bearing in mind the parameters of size and funds available.

But an attractive garden does not have to be an expensive one. …

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