Snoring Seen Passed to Children; 'Family History Is Risk Factor,' as Are Allergies, New Study Finds

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 12, 2006 | Go to article overview

Snoring Seen Passed to Children; 'Family History Is Risk Factor,' as Are Allergies, New Study Finds


Byline: Joyce Howard Price, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Snoring runs in the family, a new study by researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center has found.

The study, published in the April issue of the medical journal Chest, determined that children with at least one parent who snores more than three times weekly are three times more likely to snore themselves than children whose parents snore infrequently or not at all.

"We found that 15 percent of these children snored three or more times weekly, which is a high prevalence. That prevalence equates with that of older children and adults who are frequent snorers, and family history is a risk factor," said Dr. Maninder Kalra, a specialist in pulmonary medicine at Cincinnati Children's and lead author of the study.

He said this was one of the first large studies to examine snoring prevalence in children so young. It focused on a population of nearly 700 children, whose average age was 1 year.

What's more, the report in Chest shows that year-old children who test positive for an allergic condition known as atopy, involving allergies to foods, as well as airborne allergies to substances such as pollen, pet dander and insect venoms, are twice as likely to snore as children who do not have atopy.

"So atopy is another risk factor," Dr. Kalra said.

The researchers make it clear that snoring is not merely an annoying habit.

Instead, Dr. Kalra and research colleagues say, "snoring is the most common symptom" of a condition known as "childhood obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Snoring Seen Passed to Children; 'Family History Is Risk Factor,' as Are Allergies, New Study Finds
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.