1000 Words: Angela Bulloch; Talks about Group of Seven (One Absent Friend), 2005

By Herbert, Martin | Artforum International, April 2006 | Go to article overview

1000 Words: Angela Bulloch; Talks about Group of Seven (One Absent Friend), 2005


Herbert, Martin, Artforum International


FROM THE POINTEDLY economical gestures with which she began her career--lamps dimming or brightening in the viewer's presence (Before and After Follow Each Other, 1990); recordings of applause or jeers triggered by visitors' movements (as in Laughing Crowd Sound Piece, 1990)--to the polyphonic, multihued blend of geometric structures and son et lumiere in which she specializes today, Angela Bulloch has progressively deepened a practice fascinated with ordering systems and the subjective processing of information. Inflecting the stringent aesthetics of Conceptualism and Minimalism with destabilizing elements such as narrative, theatricality, and sensuality (and drawing modernist insularity ever closer to the spheres of contemporary design and entertainment), the Canadian-born, Berlin-based artist's work habitually underscores and problematizes normative structures.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Since the beginning of the decade, Bulloch's cornerstone has been her "Pixel Boxes"--modular cubes, named for the screen-based visual building block, whose display systems can reproduce nearly seventeen million different colors. The artist has previously arranged these objects in groups to replay scenes from landmark movies, processing them via algorithms into pulsing painterly abstractions that privilege cinematic narrative even while making it indecipherable. But in Bulloch's recent suite Group of Seven (One Absent Friend), 2005, which debuted as the centerpiece of her solo show at the Secession in Vienna last year, these changeable beacons are stitched into a sort of multifarious, open-ended orchestration. Polyreferential, life-size videos of performers combine with architectural-cum-display elements, social research materials, and a theatricalized venue to bring Bulloch's signature inter-penetration of categories to newfound levels of complexity.

THE HUMAN FIGURE is generally implied in my work, but having spent several years manipulating televisual sources in the context of my "Pixel Boxes," I wanted to include a recognizable representation of the body this time. Group of Seven features different types of video documentation, moving images of characters that "haunt" the exhibition. Each of three performers, Frank, Yuko, and Daniel, appears alone in square-format videos that are projected on the sides of pixel boxes, on the walls, or on both at once, so the image is fractured. Video monitors around the space also display performances in which you see only their silhouettes. And, finally, running through three groups of pixel boxes is an animated program I designed; there is no representational image there, only pulsing color. Previously I've arranged such boxes together to form a wall, referencing a cinema screen. But in this case I've used pixel boxes of various sizes, which are scattered around the room. As in my earlier furniture-based works, the idea of moving among these objects and measuring them with one's own body is important, but here I played with a different conception of scale and proximity. You can actually walk through a door into the larger pixel boxes. You can't take the installation in all at once.

I deliberately chose three distinct types of performer and gave each one briefing notes in the form of images that provided him or her with different starting points. Frank, who's an actor, began with a Paul Thek piece, The Tomb, 1967; I asked him to do his own interpretation of the dead hippie in that piece. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

1000 Words: Angela Bulloch; Talks about Group of Seven (One Absent Friend), 2005
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.