Dianna Frid: Museum of Contemporary Art

By Yood, James | Artforum International, April 2006 | Go to article overview

Dianna Frid: Museum of Contemporary Art


Yood, James, Artforum International


Botanical gardens are to nature what art museums are to culture, highly selective showcases in which materials are forcibly recontextualized and arranged in hierarchies for public consumption. They speak about power and hubris, with the quasi-colonialist assumption that nature is ultimately subject to human will, that people in Stockholm or London or Chicago should be able to see exotic tropical plants all year round. Dianna Frid's installation of four works, part of the Museum of Contemporary Art's ongoing "12 x 12" series surveying emerging local artists, relates a lissome narrative about palm trees and the Palm House at the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The story seems to begin with Island (all works 2006), a sculpture of a small island on which grow nine palm trees (actually potted palms). Made of chicken wire, foamcore, painted cardboard, and papier-mache, the dreamy little desert isle is set in an aqua sea, evoking an unspoiled Arcadian innocence. The focus of Frid's tale (though the works are not displayed in a particular order) then shifts to Fleet, a small piece in washy blue ink on cellophane that shimmers like stained glass. Across the sea sail three ships, model galleons with tinfoil rigging suggestive of the days of the Spanish Main. One of these also carries a tiny cutout photograph of a palm tree. Recalling the export of breadfruit in the 1962 film version of Mutiny on the Bounty, this image represents the orchestrated removal of a species from one ecosystem to another, less hospitable one. The culmination of this sequence is Greenhouse and Grove, a huge mural-like work extending across two walls of the museum, depicting the sylvan grounds and complex Victorian gingerbread architecture of Kew's glass Palm House. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Dianna Frid: Museum of Contemporary Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.