Sabrina Mezzaqui: Galleria Continua

By Drake, Cathryn | Artforum International, April 2006 | Go to article overview

Sabrina Mezzaqui: Galleria Continua


Drake, Cathryn, Artforum International


In a stark white space under a centuries-old archway, Sabrina Mezzaqui assembled works on paper and a video nearly as immaterial as thoughts under the title "Sottolineature" (Underlinings). Sitting just inside the entry way on a simple wooden pedestal, Inter-essere (Inter-being; all works 2005), consisted of rice paper formed into the shape of a book, a work so understated that it might be mistaken for a pile of pamphlets about the show. The top surface was printed with a treatise by Vietnamese Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh (in Italian translation) on the relatedness of things: A poet looking at this page will see immediately that there is a cloud inside it. WITHOUT THE CLOUD THERE IS NO RAIN, WITHOUT RAIN THE TREES CANNOT GROW, AND WITHOUT TREES WE CANNOT MAKE PAPER.... AS THIN AS THIS SHEET OF PAPER IS, IT CONTAINS EVERYTHING IN THE UNIVERSE.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

At the opposite end of the room hung La pagina bianca (The Blank Page), a diaphanous scrim of Japanese tissue paper with passages from Isak Dinesen's eponymous story transcribed in ink and scribbled over with lightly scumbled lines so that the words blurred into the paper, rendering the calligraphy more decorative than legible. Silence, as a character in the story says, ultimately tells the most profound tale. Nearby, pinned to the wall, was La scrittura del dio (The Writing of God), seven gossamer pages of the story of that name cut out of an Italian edition of Jorge Luis Borges's collection The Aleph; the pages fluttered furiously against the wall at the merest exhalation. The hearts of the lines of type had been excised precisely with a knife so that only the top and bottom bits of the letters were left; the result resembled some kind of avant-garde musical notation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Sabrina Mezzaqui: Galleria Continua
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.