Tatjana Doll: Art & Public-Cabinet P.H

By Reust, Hans Rudolf | Artforum International, April 2006 | Go to article overview

Tatjana Doll: Art & Public-Cabinet P.H


Reust, Hans Rudolf, Artforum International


A withdrawal voucher from Deutsche Bank dated 6/14/05 (Ueberweisungsscbein 1 [Transfer Fund 1]) and one from 7/15/05 (Ueberweisungsschein 2 [Transfer Fund 2]) painted in oil or lacquer on cotton fabric: this form will be processed by a machine. ADDITIONAL STATEMENTS OR CHANGES TO THE PRE-PRINTED DATA are not allowed. The contradiction between the content of this statement and the freedom of its painterly transposition is apparent, and there is something surprising about the revelation to the public of a most intimate realm: personal finances. Tatjana Doll paints unremarkable elements of her everyday life in a media-saturated urban environment, among them the tangle of cables for her chargers, a cell phone, an iPod, the prices posted at a gas station, the eBay log-in screen, posters reading HOMES FOR OUR TROOPS. And she paints these pictogram-clear motifs in swift strokes, grossly oversize in giant formats, which in this Geneva gallery have a virtually explosive effect. Doll has previously displayed her billboard-size paintings in public places in Berlin, where she lives, and in New York, inserting them between retail ads, as if a bit of gesturally free post-Pop had been beamed back to the commercial front. Likewise, Doll has painted Mercedes automobile-carriers at sizes up to about thirteen by thirty-six feet, as well as Ferraris and Hummers, from various perspectives. In this way, painting becomes a boundless and uncontrollable moment in a society that acts out its fantasies of security via the relentlessly strict cubism of Hummer SUVs. …

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