Recycling Anti-Semitism; the 'Jewish Conspiracy' Canard

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 20, 2006 | Go to article overview

Recycling Anti-Semitism; the 'Jewish Conspiracy' Canard


Byline: Suzanne Fields, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

When things go bad, blame the Jews. This is the chorus with many verses, sung often throughout history. The latest verse, reverberating now through the media and the faculty lounges, was written by two professors who have discovered that Israel, which shares certain enemies with the United States, cultivates friendships in America.

The professors, John Mearsheimer of the University of Chicago and Stephen Walt of Harvard, have stirred accusations of anti-Semitism (as well as stirring up certifiable anti-Semites) with an essay in the London Review of Books called "The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy." Angry exchanges that had been limited to the radical fringe on campuses and in radical mosques moved front and center. The professors, with respected scholarly credentials, accuse a shadowy Jewish lobby of manipulating U.S. policy in the Middle East Policy to favor Israel even as it runs against the moral and strategic interests of the United States.

They concede that "the Lobby activities are not a conspiracy of the sort depicted in tracts like the 'Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion.' They describe something more like Hillary Clinton's "vast right-wing conspiracy" against Bubbarosity in the White House. The Jewish conspiracy, as the professors see it, is connected by spectacularly unlikely links: the editorial pages of The Washington Times and the New York Times, the New Republic and the Weekly Standard, members of both the Clinton and Bush administrations, think tanks as different as the liberal Brookings Institution and the conservative American Enterprise Institute, members of both the Clinton and Bush administrations, and Democrats and Republicans left and right in Congress.

How could anyone get a word in edgewise when a lobby like this holds its noisy plotting sessions? "If this lobby is so powerful," asks Dennis Ross, onetime negotiator in the Middle East, "how come every major Arab arms sale that they opposed they lost on?" The history of blaming the Jews is a long one. After Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire in the fourth century, anti-Semitism emerged to stay over the next 16 centuries. When an earthquake followed by a hurricane struck Rome in 1021, Jews were blamed. Several were tortured, confessed and burned. When bubonic plague, the Black Death, devastated Europe in the 14th century, the Jews, who of course died along with Christians, were blamed for spreading the plague.

"The experience of the Jews during the plague was a precursor of the modern scapegoat role and the secular 'Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion,' " write Paul Grosser and Edwin Halperin in "Anti-Semitism: The Causes and Effects of a Prejudice. …

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Recycling Anti-Semitism; the 'Jewish Conspiracy' Canard
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