The Dearth of Resources for Entering Editors: There Are Available '... Few Books, a Large but Scattered Field of Articles, and the Handouts and Tip Sheets Collected at Relatively Few Web Sites.'

By Stepp, Carl Sessions | Nieman Reports, Spring 2006 | Go to article overview

The Dearth of Resources for Entering Editors: There Are Available '... Few Books, a Large but Scattered Field of Articles, and the Handouts and Tip Sheets Collected at Relatively Few Web Sites.'


Stepp, Carl Sessions, Nieman Reports


Some 20 years ago, my dean at the University of Maryland, Reese Cleghorn, asked me to develop a course for the editors of our student newspaper, The Diamondback. We were teaching basic copyediting, Cleghorn said, but it was clear that these young editors needed more. They needed to know about managing people, coordinating coverage, developing ideas, budgeting time, and keeping themselves and their staffs productive and sane under stress.

I was a former editor, just arrived at the university, and this sounded like a wonderful course, one 1 wanted to take myself rather than teach. I set out to collect the most relevant books and materials for this much-needed class. I found almost nothing. There were books on reporting, copyediting and design, on upper-level management, and on general matters of leadership and ethics. But the shelves were nearly bare of materials aimed directly at those key newsroom figures, the midlevel assigning editors.

Today, a generation later, things are better, but nowhere near what is needed. In both the news industry and the universities that feed it, editing is neglected. We fail to invest intellectually in identifying, recruiting, developing and nurturing editors, especially at the assigning level, and this failure is reflected in the profession's literature.

After a few years of teaching our advanced editing course, I wrote a book, "Editing for Today's Newsroom: New Perspectives for a Changing Profession," which was published in 1989. That this book remains in use in some classrooms and newsrooms speaks to the absence of contemporary, comprehensive texts for assigning editors. While fledgling and veteran writers can choose from dozens of fine textbooks and trade volumes in their area and copyeditors and designers can select from at least a shelf-full, assigning editors must piece together their libraries from a few books, a large but scattered field of articles, and the handouts and tip sheets collected at relatively few Web sites. [See accompanying box for specific titles and relevant Web sites.]

Meantime, we must be heartened that some progress has occurred. The literature today, if not adequate, certainly surpasses what I found two decades ago. It falls into two broad categories: a few works expressly for midlevel editors and more general works that can help midlevel editors. Let's hope that today's renewed interest in editing will inspire even more advances in the literature.

Resources for Midlevel Editors

This list of books, articles and Web sites has been compiled by Carl Sessions Stepp, a former assigning editor and now journalism professor at the University of Maryland.

Books About Editing

"Caught in the Middle: How to Improve the Lives and Performance of Newspaper Middle Managers," by Sharon L. Peters. Published in 1999 and now downloadable from Northwestern's www.mediamanagementcenter.org. Peters surveyed more than 500 journalists and wrote about the problems of midlevel editors from their perspective and also the views of their managers and their reporters. Great insights into the problems and some suggestions for help.

"Coaching Writers: Editors and Reporters Working Together Across Media Platforms," second edition, by Roy Peter Clark and Don Fry. Best book of its kind. Clark and Fry have been promoting collegial editing for two decades, and the book is full of wisdom, humor and hands-on techniques.

"Editing for Today's Newsroom: New Perspectives for a Changing Profession," by Carl Sessions Stepp. Out-of-date in terms of technology, but still somewhat useful in advising assigning editors on how they can make better decisions about everything from copy to coaching to ethics.

"The Editorial Eye," second edition, by Jane T. Harrigan and Karen Brown Dunlap. Mostly for copyeditors, but includes friendly and helpful insights into "the big picture" of editing.

"The Effective Editor: How to Lead Your Staff to Better Writing and Better Teamwork," by Foster Davis and Karen Dunlap. …

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