Terror in Chinatown: President Bush Calls Communist China a "Partner" in the War on Terror, but Some Chinese Americans Are Accusing China of Bringing Its Own Terror Campaign to the USA

By Canfield, Roger | The New American, April 17, 2006 | Go to article overview

Terror in Chinatown: President Bush Calls Communist China a "Partner" in the War on Terror, but Some Chinese Americans Are Accusing China of Bringing Its Own Terror Campaign to the USA


Canfield, Roger, The New American


President Bush calls China a "strategic partner" in the war on terror, but some Chinese Americans are accusing the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) of bringing its own terror campaign to the USA. They believe the CCP ordered the murder of Allen Ngai Leung, 56, an admired community leader in San Francisco. The day after Leung's murder, an anonymous caller to the worldwide Sound of Hope radio said, "You want to know who killed Allen Leung? Call Chinese Consulate and Chinese Chamber of Commerce." And then hung up.

Leung's murder "is spreading terror ... [to] warn [those who] ... dare to oppose the CCP," the Epoch Times reported on March 8. "We have now seen the long arm of the Communist regime infiltrate the United States itself.... It is ... a frightening escalation of the Communists' plans to silence and intimidate the overseas Chinese people, in San Francisco, here, and around the world."

These accusations seem well founded. In mid-2005, Chen Yonglin, the 1st secretary of the Chinese consulate-general in Sydney, Australia, defected and revealed his network of 1,000 spies and enforcers whose job it was to intimidate people of Chinese descent. And the U.S. House of Representatives unanimously passed a resolution urging the U.S. attorney general to investigate Chinese consular officials in these actions on U.S. soil.

PRC Flag Flies Over Chinatown

The CCP's presence in America is growing and becoming entrenched, especially in Chinatown, which historically has been very anti-communist.

Allen Leung fought the CCP's efforts to make inroads in Chinatown. A Chinese-language reporter told THE NEW AMERICAN, "Without Allen every flag in Chinatown will be red." A well-placed source, claiming to be close to Allen Leung, told TNA that the Chinese Consulate pays money to organizations to fly the communist flag as a show of support for Communist China and has paid perhaps a million dollars to major organizations to do so.

Our source said that the CCP desperately wanted control of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, also known as the Six Companies, to further its influence. The Six Companies is a single entity representing most of the highly influential traditional Chinese family fraternal organizations. Evidently, the CCP has been having success in its efforts. According to the Associated Press, in March 2004 Daniel Horn, the newly elected president of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, ditched his own organization's ceremony--which uses the flags of the United States and the Republic of China--to attend a pro-communist event. Horn and friends went to a restaurant, displayed flags of the People's Republic of China, and sang the national song of Mainland China with the consul general of the PRC, according to an AP report of June 30, 2004.

Leung was openly critical of Horn's actions.

A city official, insistently nameless, told the San Francisco Chronicle that the CCP was trying to unify all overseas Chinese under the PRC flag. "Five years ago you could see flags of the Republic of China.... Today there are many communist China flags. Communism is the newly rising political power."

Enter the Red Queen

The CCP is making gains in areas heavily settled by Chinese not only through large payoffs, but also with the aid of well-placed people. In the San Francisco area, that person is Rose Pak. The Los Angeles Times once described Rose Pak as the single most powerful person in San Francisco without benefit of having been elected to a public office. In that city, you don't have to say Rose Pak. Just say "Rose." Or just say "she." Everyone knows who you are talking about. A Chinese-language reporter told TNA, "In Chinatown, Rose is treated like royalty. 'She' enjoys city-subsidized low-income housing" overlooking the Bay Bridge. And "when 'she' goes to a beauty salon she does not pay."

Rose Pak's visible means of income is being a general consultant to the Chinese Chamber of Commerce. …

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