Bruce Cops It; Try It

The Mirror (London, England), April 28, 2006 | Go to article overview

Bruce Cops It; Try It


Byline: DAVID EDWARDS

Guns. An against-the-clock mission. A plot that can easily be described in less than 10 words. More guns. And all of it pretty average. Yes, it's another Bruce Willis movie.

Following on from The Smirk's recent actioners such as Hostage, The Jackal, Lucky Number Slevin and Last Man Standing, 16 Blocks is yet another explosive thriller which does the job without ever coming close to greatness.

What a shame, because it has the making of a terrific film with well developed characters, a decent leading performance and a snappy pace. Then, before you can say Yippee-ki-yay, it all descends into MOR ho-humedness.

Set in New York, Willis plays grizzled detective Jack Mosley who's just finished his night shift and only wants to go home to sleep off a hangover. But as he's about to punch out at 8.02am, he's assigned the task of escorting petty criminal Eddie Bunker (Mos Def) 16 blocks across town to testify in a corrupt cop trial.

Simple, right? Wrong. The officers that Eddie is about to finger want him dead, meaning he and Jack are in for a rough ride as they try to outwit the assassins and attempt to get to the court before 10am.

Full credit to Willis who completely inhabits his character - a broken-down, alcoholic deadbeat with a bad leg. Just looking at his puffy, dried-out face is enough to shrink your liver. …

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