How Hadrian's Wall Was Built to Create the Kingdom of Scotland. er, Isn't It in England? History Booklet for New British Citizens Littered with Embarrassing Errors

Daily Mail (London), April 29, 2006 | Go to article overview

How Hadrian's Wall Was Built to Create the Kingdom of Scotland. er, Isn't It in England? History Booklet for New British Citizens Littered with Embarrassing Errors


Byline: ANDREW TOLMIE

MOST Scots would be bemused if someone told them their country had been created by Emperor Hadrian building a wall - in England.

And pity the poor person who tries to inform Glaswegians that their city was built on profits from the slave trade.

Yet these are only two of the many historical errors contained in a new Government booklet - aimed at teaching immigrants how to be good British citizens.

And last night there were calls for the pamphlet - which carries the Home Office logo - to be binned.

Experts claim the section on Scottish history contained in the official guide, Life In The UK: A Journey To Citizenship, is littered with embarrassing mistakes.

The publication is meant to be used by immigrants to help them pass new citizenship tests, which came into effect last November.

But historians claim they have been shocked by the number of factual inaccuracies about some of Scotland's most famous events.

The pamphlet claims that the Massacre of Glencoe was in 1688, two years before the Battle of the Boyne - but it was actually two years after, in 1692.

It also states that Oliver Cromwell invaded Scotland after he fought the Battle of Worcester, while the opposite is true.

Historians have also been angered by a number of claims which could be regarded as offensive.

Glasgow is described as a city built on profits from the slave trade, while Hadrian's Wall apparently created the Kingdom of Scotland, despite being in England.

Other insensitive passages in the Scottish section include a reference to supporters of Bonnie Prince Charlie as 'mainly Catholic tribesmen in the Highlands'. …

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How Hadrian's Wall Was Built to Create the Kingdom of Scotland. er, Isn't It in England? History Booklet for New British Citizens Littered with Embarrassing Errors
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