Bike Patrol: Policing Public Housing Developments

By Grabin, Scott D. | The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, September 1993 | Go to article overview

Bike Patrol: Policing Public Housing Developments


Grabin, Scott D., The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin


A drug dealer completes a sale of crack cocaine to a youth in a public housing development. Suddenly, a specially trained police officer riding a mountain bike confronts the unsuspecting felon. With no time to react, the youth and the drug dealer soon find themselves facing a wall, while being handcuffed and placed under arrest.

The arresting officer belongs to the Bike Patrol Unit of the New York City Housing Police Department (NYCHPD). The department organized the unit in an effort to address the ever-increasing challenges of providing security and a safe environment for the more than 600,000 public housing residents in the city.

The Concept

The need for a bike patrol developed out of a desire to improve the quality of life for residents in New York City's public housing developments. Faced with a rising level of violent crime, the NYCHPD wanted to enhance the visibility of officers in the community, thereby accentuating the impact of their presence. The bike patrol concept, currently employed by over 400 police departments across the United States, provided the most cost-effective and environmentally sound approach to patrolling the hallways, walkways, and perimeter streets of the 350 public highrise residential developments in the city.

Program Implementation

Realizing the benefits of obtaining as much information as possible on the bike patrol concept, the NYCHPD chief sent two officers to a "Police on Bikes" conference. There, the officers met with, and learned from, members of police bike patrol units from around the country. After attending this meeting, the officers then visited several departments and saw firsthand how their bike patrols operated. As a result of the conference and onsite visits, the NYCHPD knew what was required to organize an aggressive and effective bike patrol.

After giving the "green light" to the program, department administrators committed personnel and resources to ensure its success. Officers traveled to various sites to receive training, including instruction in bike mechanics. In less than 3 months, NYCHPD officers were patrolling the Housing Authority's highrise buildings on bikes.

Selection of Bike Officers

Nearly 120 applicants vied for 40 available positions after viewing an introductory video on bicycle patrol tactics shown at all command posts. Each applicant underwent a background investigation, which included a review of past disciplinary actions, civilian complaints, and attendance records.

The 40 officers selected for the newly formed unit then received a three-part medical exam before beginning the 1-month training program. The medical testing guaranteed each officer's ability to meet the strenuous physical requirements of the position.

The first part of the test consisted of a blood pressure reading, an audiogram and visual acuity exam (that included distance and color perception testing), a glucose and protein test, an EKG, and a skin caliper measure of body fat. Next, the officers took a stress test to determine cardiovascular fitness and to detect any heart irregularities. The final phase required officers to undergo a step test and flexibility exam. Weight lifting and 20 minutes on a stationary bicycle concluded the final portion. After successfully completing all phases of the screening and testing, the officers chosen for the patrol began their training.

Training

Bike patrol officers complete a rigorous 1-month training program before being assigned to a neighborhood. The program focuses on safety, physical fitness, and bicycle maintenance.

The safety portion of the training program concentrates on riding techniques and tactics and accident prevention. Instructors teach officers techniques for handling weapons while on bike patrol. Their training also includes vehicle stops, takedowns of suspects, and stair climbs, as well as how to perform interior vertical checks of a highrise building. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bike Patrol: Policing Public Housing Developments
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.