Out of the Mouths of Babes (and Teens)

By De Santis, Solange | Anglican Journal, April 2006 | Go to article overview

Out of the Mouths of Babes (and Teens)


De Santis, Solange, Anglican Journal


We thought reviewing children's books ould be appropriate for the Easter issue, since children often receive gifts at Easter. Who better to review such books than the people for whom they were made? We chose books appropriate to the ages of the reviewers and recorded their honest opinions.

Song of Creation

Simone Foster, AGE 6 REVIEWER

Song of Creation is a prayer book. The author says the prayers come from the Book of Common Prayer. It tells us that the animals and nature are all praying to God. The eagles and horses, the buffaloes and the dandelions are all saying to praise God "and magnify him forever." The book didn't tell a story, it told us prayers. I enjoyed reading it because I liked the prayers. People could be praying while they are reading this book.

I liked the pictures in it, too, especially the book cover because I really like animals and it had lots of ponies.

I think that little kids should read this book because the pictures are pretty and the whole book is interesting.

Dear God ...

Little Letter Prayers for Little People

Molly Foster, AGE 8 REVIEWER

This book is a book of prayers and it's bout loving other people even though they're different. The book is full of different prayers and it has little envelopes with prayers inside them. There are prayers about nature, animals, food, happiness and bedtime. The one I liked went like this: "Dear God: please look after everyone I love. Protect the people who love me and care for me and let them always be happy."

There are pictures for each section of prayers and they are happy pictures, so when I'm sad, I sometimes look at this book and it makes me feel happy. My favourite section has a picture of a little girl and her teddy bear and bunny rabbit looking up to the moon (which is smiling back at her) and an angel looking down on the little girl This picture is with a bedtime prayer.

The prayers on the pages are mostly from the Bible, and the prayers in the envelopes are written by the person who wrote the book. I like the last page of the book because you can write the last prayer yourself and put it in the envelope. Here is my prayer: "Thank you God for my family and friends, thank you God for this world you made. Thank you God for the food that I eat and the water that I drink. Thank you God for all the wonderful things you made."

I think God would like this book if he read it because it's about sharing and saying thanks to God for all of the wonderful things he made. Also, I think all ages would like this book because it is not just for little kids. Everybody should be saying thanks to God for all the wonderful things he made and if he didn't make all these things, we wouldn't have such a nice world and friends and family.

Molly and Simone Foster are the daughters of Anglican Journal editor Leanne Larmondin.

What You Will See Inside

... a Synagogue, Catholic Church, Mosque and Hindu Temple

Florence Peters, AGE 8 REVIEWER

These books teach children about places of worship like a mosque, a Hindu temple, a synagogue and a Roman Catholic church. They are colourful and have lots of pictures. I was wondering why they don't have a book about an Anglican church.

They tell you the most important things about these places. A mosque looks like an empty room and they found 31 pages of interesting things to say about it. I wondered if a Catholic church used bread and wine for communion like our Anglican church and on page 12 and 13, I found the answer--yes.

I liked the Hindu temple because it is very colourful and people have very nice clothing. It is a very elaborate building. There is a Hindu temple down the road from our house in Milton, Ont. and the book taught me what is inside it. They have many gods. The best part is the feasts, as you see on pages 21 and 23--stairs of food laid in front of their gods. …

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