Death Threats, Arrests, Imprisonment, Torture: Journalism Is a Dangerous Profession in Huanta, Peru, Where 14 Journalists Have Been Killed since 1983

By Lange, Karen | Editor & Publisher, October 9, 1993 | Go to article overview

Death Threats, Arrests, Imprisonment, Torture: Journalism Is a Dangerous Profession in Huanta, Peru, Where 14 Journalists Have Been Killed since 1983


Lange, Karen, Editor & Publisher


WHERE ALEJANDRO CORONADO comes from, journalism is such a dangerous profession that there is a tomb to hold its dead.

Three of 14 journalists killed since 1983 in Coronado's hometown of Huanta, Peru, lie in the mausoleum. It has room for 20 more.

On the side of the one-story cement building, erected in 1985 by Coronado and another local reporter, appear the words, "The journalist is a friend."

That message often has been lost on the government soldiers, local militiamen, drug traffickers and Shining Path guerrillas struggling for power in and around Huanta.

Coronado, a radio broadcaster, Reuters correspondent and freelance writer for a national daily and newsweekly, has suffered death threats, arrests, imprisonment and torture. He has lost five of six journalist friends with whom he grew up in the poor southern mountain town.

The 28-year-old reporter told his story many times during the spring semester as a visiting fellow at Duke University's DeWitt Wallace Center for Communications and Journalism in Durham, N.C.

A Ford Foundation grant has allowed the center to expand its program to include journalists who work in emerging democracies or under conditions of hardship, executive director Dee Reid said. Coronado said the most valuable part of the visit for him was sharing experiences with other journalists, including those from Poland and Germany.

"In all the countries, there are problems with censorship of the press" he said, speaking through a translator. "The difference is in some countries, there's taking away of liberties, and in other countries, there's taking away of life.

"You never know what they're going to do," Coronado said, referring to the guerrilla group that took up arms against the government in 1980. "They don't necessarily kill you because they want to kill you. They want to see what effect your death will have, what kind of publicity they can get."

Other groups have their reasons for killing journalists.

"To work as a journalist in Huanta is very difficult," said Robin Kirk, who met Coronado while freelancing for the San Francisco Chronicle in Peru from 1989 to 1991. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Death Threats, Arrests, Imprisonment, Torture: Journalism Is a Dangerous Profession in Huanta, Peru, Where 14 Journalists Have Been Killed since 1983
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.