Hogan Eyes PC Software as Rx for Bottom Line

By Crockett, Barton | American Banker, November 19, 1993 | Go to article overview

Hogan Eyes PC Software as Rx for Bottom Line


Crockett, Barton, American Banker


Hogan Systems, Inc., a big supplier of mainframe software to banks, plans to greatly expand its product line for personal computers, beginning withbranch automation software due out this summer.

Hogan hopes the products will quickly become a major part of its revenue stream, which comes primarily from mainframe software sales and professional services.

"Our mission is very important to Hogan," said Walter R. Tallent, director of the Dallas-based company's technology strategy and head of the branch software project.

"If you look Out two to three years from now, I would expect a good portion of our total license revenue to be coming from branch" automation software, he added.

Meeting Banks' Specifications

Mr. Tallent said that the branch automation software is being developed to the specifications of a committee of six banks that are based in the United States, Europe, and Hong Kong. He declined to name them.

Since Hogan was founded in 1977, its principal business has been the sale of mainframe software that large banks use to track retail loans and deposits. International Business Machines Corp. has had exclusive North American marketing rights to this software since 1986.

More than 100 large banks in the United States and abroad use the software, including BankAmerica Corp. and Citicorp.

Service Business Expanding

In recent years, Hogan has begun to diversify by greatly expanding its professional services business and introducing new mainframe software products, including one for tracking bank earnings.

Five years ago, only about one quarter of Hogan's $33.3 million in total revenues was derived from professional services, while the rest came principally from license fees, maintenance fees, and royalties from mainframe software.

By the 1993 fiscal year, which ended in March, two-thirds of Hogan's revenues of $64.5 million came from professional services, while nearly all of the rest was split between licensing and maintenance fees for mainframe software.

However, the professional services business took a blow in the first half -- ended in September -- of Hogan's 1994 fiscal year.

License Income Increasing

The termination of big consulting projects with IBM and First Financial Management Corp. caused the company's professional services revenues to decline by $6 million in the six months ending Sept. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hogan Eyes PC Software as Rx for Bottom Line
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.