Rural, Small Town Health Care: In Need of a Shot in the Arm

By Peterson, Doug | Nation's Cities Weekly, October 11, 1993 | Go to article overview

Rural, Small Town Health Care: In Need of a Shot in the Arm


Peterson, Doug, Nation's Cities Weekly


Health care access in small town and rural America is frequently a matter of life and death, not just to the people who live there. It's an issue that cuts to the very survival of many such communities.

Access to good medical care is an imperative for economic development and community growth. Some small towns have even begun to offer bounties to citizens who successfully recruit health professionals to set up practices in small towns particularly those communities that are geographically isolated

What is included in the Clinton Administration Health Care proposal that is particularly applicable to smaller communities in America?

The Clinton Administration plan contains provisions intended to attract medical professionals to small town America and to provide payment to health providers from all who receive care. The administration plan also contains special limits on health care costs for small employers, although these caps are not currently proposed for small town and city governments as employers (see related stories in this issue of NCW). While not currently applicable to cities that are small employers, this provision may be particularly important because the job base of smaller communities is predominantly composed of small employers.

A series of public health initiatives proposed in the plan as well as the coverage under all health plans of preventative services may be of particular value in many rural communities, providing income streams for currently uncompensated or unprovided care and outreach.

The plan also includes a number of sections suggesting ways in which special programs developed by the new regional health alliances can incentivize the provision of health care in rural and underserved areas. Small communities will have to be particularly vigilant as states draw up regional alliance boundaries or decide on a state single-payer plan to make sure that the boundaries will provide appropriate care. In thinly settled states where much health care is obtained across state lines such structural issues will also be very important.

While the plan contains a number of reforms to unprove access and availability there are graphic characteristics that are beyond the ability of the plan to change. It is likely that the choice of health plan options in rural areas will continue to be less diverse than in urban areas even after reform.

Small Cities as Employers: No Special Treatment

Small cities will be required to pay at least 80 percent of the regional alliance health premiums just as with all other cities. As with all other cities they will not be eligible for the 7.9 percent of payroll cap or the special small employers caps which are discussed below. As with all other cities small communities will be required to pay for full family unit coverage and pay premiums for part-time workers on a pro-rata basis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rural, Small Town Health Care: In Need of a Shot in the Arm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.