Libros De Ciencias En Espanol

By Schon, Isabel | Science and Children, March 2006 | Go to article overview

Libros De Ciencias En Espanol


Schon, Isabel, Science and Children


Byline: Isabel Schon

If, like many of us, you have Spanish-speaking students in your science class, you will likely be interested in learning about the recent releases of Spanish trade books for children. From delightful board books and counting books for the very young to comprehensible series on contemporary scientific topics and lively introductions to Earth science, these books in Spanish, recently published in Mexico, Venezuela, Spain, and the United States, will draw Spanish speakers (and Spanish learners) into the world of science.

A tentative grade level is indicated for each book, but remember to evaluate each student's reading ability, interests, and taste when choosing reading material in any language.

For the Very Young

David huele! (David Smells!). ISBN: 0-439-75511-5. David Shannon. New York: Scholastic. 2005. 14 pp. $6.99. (Grades preK). David, a mischief-making toddler, discovers his five senses by doing things not encouraged by an unseen caregiver. From petting a dog, to banging on a drum, to finally playing a joyful peek-a-boo, this board book with delightful illustrations is fun and educational.

El zoologico (The Zoo). ISBN: 84-246-3833-6. Cristina Losanto. Barcelona: La Galera. 2004. 10 pp. $10.95. (Grades preK). This picture book depicts humorous scenes of families and groups of children visiting a zoo. The witty illustrations will encourage lots of sharing and laughs. In addition, toddlers and caregivers will appreciate the foldout format and the clear, simple glossary with drawings and definite articles.

En el mar (Under the Sea). ISBN: 0-7460-6398-9. Alastair Smith and Judy Tatchell. Translated by Germa Alonso de la Serna. Tulsa: EDC Publishing. 2004. 16 pp. $11.95. (Grades preK-2). Sea fauna are introduced with full-page color illustrations and well-placed lift-the-flaps that show dolphins, sharks, sea horses, octopuses, and other fish as they play, feed, interact with each other, and protect themselves. Some adults may object to a certain degree of anthropomorphism; nonetheless, this is a thoughtful view of life under the sea.

Estela, princesa de la noche (Stella, Princess of the Sky). ISBN: 980-257-304-3. Mari-Louise Gay. Translated by Veronica Uribe. Caracas: Ekare. 2004. 32 pp. $8.95. (Grades preK-1). Estela explains to her always questioning younger brother why the Sun appears red at sunset, why raccoons "wear masks," and shares other comforting information about the night sky and night animals, such as fireflies. Gay's whimsical watercolor illustrations add to this playful introduction to nighttime.

Grande o pequena es mi pelota: El libro de los contrarios (Big, Small, Little Red Ball: A Changing Book of Opposites). ISBN: 84-7864-816-X. Emma Dodd. Translated by Luz Orihuela. Barcelona: Combel. 2004. 18 pp. $15.95. (Grades preK). Introduce preschoolers to opposites like dormido (asleep) and despierto (awake) and arriba (up) and abajo (down) with this board book in which pulled tabs change the pictures.

Nos fuimos todos de safari (We All Went on Safari). ISBN: 1-905236-08-5. Laurie Krebs. Translated by Yanitzia Canetti. Cambridge: Barefoot. 2005. 30 pp. $6.99. (Grades preK-2). As Arusha, Mosi, Tumpe, and their Maasai friends set out on a safari through the grasslands of Tanzania, they encounter various animals that they count from 1 to 10 in both Spanish and Swahili. The colorful illustrations, map, and informative notes about the animals and people of Tanzania make this a unique counting book.

Astronomy

Astronomia (Astronomy). ISBN: 0-7460-6389X. Rachel Firth. Translated by Antonio Navarro. Tulsa: EDC Publishing. 2004. 48 pp. $8.95. (Grades 3-5). With numerous simple suggestions for observing the sky, this attractive paperback introduces readers to the positions, motion, and composition of celestial bodies and explains the explosions of stars and the evolution of galaxies. Like the previous four titles in this series-Aves (Birds), Dinosaurios (Dinosaurs), Serpientes (Snakes), and Tiburones (Sharks), it encourages children to link to various websites. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Libros De Ciencias En Espanol
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.