An Interview with Henry Mintzberg: Reading Mr. Mintzberg's Latest Book on Business Management Education, Mr. Murphy Was Struck by Its Relevance to Educational Leadership Programs. to Find out How the Ideas in the Book Could Be Adapted by Ed Schools, Mr. Murphy Went Straight to the Source for Some Pithy Advice

By Murphy, Jerome T. | Phi Delta Kappan, March 2006 | Go to article overview

An Interview with Henry Mintzberg: Reading Mr. Mintzberg's Latest Book on Business Management Education, Mr. Murphy Was Struck by Its Relevance to Educational Leadership Programs. to Find out How the Ideas in the Book Could Be Adapted by Ed Schools, Mr. Murphy Went Straight to the Source for Some Pithy Advice


Murphy, Jerome T., Phi Delta Kappan


For more than 30 years, Henry Mintzberg has been writing about management and management education with great passion, insight, and influence. His recent book, Managers Not MBAs, presents a stinging critique of business schools, indicting them for focusing on the wrong people--young adults with little experience--and for serving up the wrong fare--too much analysis and technique. (1) Having exposed the problems, Mintzberg presents a fascinating alternative to the MBA that targets practicing managers and uses their real-world experiences as the primary instructional material.

Mintzberg's provocative ideas are aimed at a business audience, but, as the following small sample shows, they have much to offer those preparing educational leaders in the U.S.

The essence of management. "We don't need heroes in positions of influence any more than technocrats. We need balanced, dedicated people who practice a style of managing that can be called 'engaging.' Such people believe that their purpose is to leave behind stronger organizations" (p. 1).

How leadership and management differ. "Leadership is supposed to be something bigger, more important. I reject this distinction, simply because managers have to lead and leaders have to manage. Management without leadership is sterile; leadership without management is disconnected and encourages hubris" (p. 6).

What management is. "Put together a good deal of craft with a certain amount of art and some science, and you end up with a job that is above all a practice. . . . After almost a century of trying, by any reasonable assessment management has become neither a science nor a profession" (pp. 10, 11).

Turning novices into managers. "Trying to teach management to someone who has never managed is like trying to teach psychology to someone who has never met another human being. Organizations are complex phenomena. Managing them is a difficult, nuanced business, requiring all sorts of tacit understanding that can only be gained in context" (p. 9).

What management education needs. "It is not revolution or reorganization we need, at least for starters, so much as reconception . . . we need to rethink who we educate, how, and for what purpose; we need to rethink how and why we do research, and for whom; and we need to rethink how we are organized to do both. And then, if we are honest, we will have no choice but to change" (p. 415).

I recently had an opportunity to speak with Mintzberg about his approach to educating managers and how it could be applied to the preparation of school leaders.

Murphy: What is an engaging style of management?

Mintzberg: I mean that people are involved, they're personally engaged, they're not disconnected. As a result, they are able to engage others.

Murphy: You write that management is a practice. What does that mean?

Mintzberg: It means that it is mainly a craft. It's done on the ground. It means people know what's going on. It's not something you learn in school. You can't create managers in the classroom. You don't have to go to management school to be a manager.

Murphy: If that's the case, what can universities contribute?

Mintzberg: They can bring in people who are already in managerial positions and let them learn from their own experiences and from one another's experiences. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An Interview with Henry Mintzberg: Reading Mr. Mintzberg's Latest Book on Business Management Education, Mr. Murphy Was Struck by Its Relevance to Educational Leadership Programs. to Find out How the Ideas in the Book Could Be Adapted by Ed Schools, Mr. Murphy Went Straight to the Source for Some Pithy Advice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.