Gutter Language Demeans Us All

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), May 22, 2006 | Go to article overview

Gutter Language Demeans Us All


The time has come to think of the sense of moral decline in our society today. I don't attend church, but I am a Christian, and I believe in certain standards of behaviour.

My twin sister and myself were born in 1937, a brother was born, the last of 12 children. We did not have much in the sense of worldly goods but what we did have, above all, was a mother who was everything to everyone. She helped so many people in her life, from the cradle to the grave. Meaning she helped to bring new life into the world. She helped to lay out the dead, she did not like anyone to take the Lord's name in vain. As a result of this, I cannot tolerate anyone using foul language to me or in front of me. In the past I would not let anyone do this to me or in front of me. I have heard it used in the so-called upper echelons of society as well as the lower class. I never had it from my parents or siblings, or off my husband and children. To me it shows total lack of respect, I call it gutter language, it does not make you look big ( it makes you look cheap.

M CURTIS, Dunston.

We're worth the free rides

REGARDING the letter from SH, of Westerhope, telling her 15-year-old daughter not to give pensioners her seat on the bus, as she's paid and they haven't.

Well my dear, the days when children or men gave up their seats went out the window a long time ago.

There are a lot of nasty kids around the streets now, mugging and raping old people. Pensioners have been kids, when we did walk to school, later pushed our children to and from shopping or wherever. No pushchairs on buses, maybe one could get on the train but you had to travel in the guard's van, no windows and you gave up your seat without being told to if you were on the bus.

You yourself will be a pensioner if you are lucky one day. Most pensioners have paid their taxes and insurance stamps and are well worth a free ride for the time we have left.

E WRIGHT, Tyne Wear.

We must learn to be friends

THERE is disappointment and concern that the BNP has been distributing copies of the cartoon causing pain and offence to sincere Muslims. This literature is being handed out at football games at St James' Park.

Such canvassing is divisive and irresponsible considering bridges of trust are being established between local Muslims and the wider community. …

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Gutter Language Demeans Us All
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